Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure

Melvin J. Fregly, Fabian Rossi, Zhongjie Sun, Nihal Tümer, J. Robert Cade, Donald Hegland, Muhittin Yürekli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic exposure to cold (5°C) is well known to increase both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in brown adipose tissue and systemic blood pressure. The effect of chronic dietary administration of the α-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, and the amino acid, L-arginine, on both the elevation of blood pressure during exposure to cold and on TH activity and expression of TH mRNA in the adrenal glands of rats was studied. As observed previously, chronic exposure to cold increased systolic blood pressure significantly and induced cardiac hypertrophy. Chronic dietary treatment with prazosin (8 mg/kg food) and arginine (20 g/kg food) returned blood pressure to control levels, did not affect body weight significantly, but failed to prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Both prazosin and L-arginine reduced the drinking response to administration of angiotensin II. Treatment with arginine and prazosin was accompanied by a significant increase in the urinary outputs of dopamine and L-DOPA. The 3 cold- treated groups (control, L-arginine and prazosin) had increases in plasma T3 and decreases in plasma T4 and plasma renin activity. Plasma concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine were increased significantly in the L-arginine-treated group. TH mRNA and TH activity in the adrenal glands were increased in the 3 cold-treated groups and these measures were correlated directly and significantly with plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations. Although both prazosin and arginine prevented the cold-induced elevation of blood pressure, they did not prevent the increase in TH mRNA, TH activity or epinephrine in plasma. The protective effect of arginine and prazosin in cold-induced hypertension may be related both to their reduction in plasma renin activity and to a reduced responsiveness to angiotensin II, as well as to their abilities to increase the secretion of dopamine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-362
Number of pages12
JournalPharmacology
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prazosin
Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Arginine
Blood Pressure
Epinephrine
Cardiomegaly
Adrenal Glands
Renin
Angiotensin II
Messenger RNA
Dopamine
Norepinephrine
Food
Adrenergic Antagonists
Brown Adipose Tissue
Drinking
Body Weight
Hypertension
Amino Acids
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Fregly, M. J., Rossi, F., Sun, Z., Tümer, N., Robert Cade, J., Hegland, D., & Yürekli, M. (1994). Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure. Pharmacology, 49(6), 351-362. https://doi.org/10.1159/000139254

Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure. / Fregly, Melvin J.; Rossi, Fabian; Sun, Zhongjie; Tümer, Nihal; Robert Cade, J.; Hegland, Donald; Yürekli, Muhittin.

In: Pharmacology, Vol. 49, No. 6, 01.01.1994, p. 351-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fregly, MJ, Rossi, F, Sun, Z, Tümer, N, Robert Cade, J, Hegland, D & Yürekli, M 1994, 'Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure', Pharmacology, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 351-362. https://doi.org/10.1159/000139254
Fregly, Melvin J. ; Rossi, Fabian ; Sun, Zhongjie ; Tümer, Nihal ; Robert Cade, J. ; Hegland, Donald ; Yürekli, Muhittin. / Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure. In: Pharmacology. 1994 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 351-362.
@article{b08f6af858344150aa6006e1c6585ba1,
title = "Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure",
abstract = "Chronic exposure to cold (5°C) is well known to increase both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in brown adipose tissue and systemic blood pressure. The effect of chronic dietary administration of the α-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, and the amino acid, L-arginine, on both the elevation of blood pressure during exposure to cold and on TH activity and expression of TH mRNA in the adrenal glands of rats was studied. As observed previously, chronic exposure to cold increased systolic blood pressure significantly and induced cardiac hypertrophy. Chronic dietary treatment with prazosin (8 mg/kg food) and arginine (20 g/kg food) returned blood pressure to control levels, did not affect body weight significantly, but failed to prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Both prazosin and L-arginine reduced the drinking response to administration of angiotensin II. Treatment with arginine and prazosin was accompanied by a significant increase in the urinary outputs of dopamine and L-DOPA. The 3 cold- treated groups (control, L-arginine and prazosin) had increases in plasma T3 and decreases in plasma T4 and plasma renin activity. Plasma concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine were increased significantly in the L-arginine-treated group. TH mRNA and TH activity in the adrenal glands were increased in the 3 cold-treated groups and these measures were correlated directly and significantly with plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations. Although both prazosin and arginine prevented the cold-induced elevation of blood pressure, they did not prevent the increase in TH mRNA, TH activity or epinephrine in plasma. The protective effect of arginine and prazosin in cold-induced hypertension may be related both to their reduction in plasma renin activity and to a reduced responsiveness to angiotensin II, as well as to their abilities to increase the secretion of dopamine.",
author = "Fregly, {Melvin J.} and Fabian Rossi and Zhongjie Sun and Nihal T{\"u}mer and {Robert Cade}, J. and Donald Hegland and Muhittin Y{\"u}rekli",
year = "1994",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000139254",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "351--362",
journal = "Pharmacology",
issn = "0031-7012",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of chronic treatment with prazosin and L-arginine on the elevation of blood pressure during cold exposure

AU - Fregly, Melvin J.

AU - Rossi, Fabian

AU - Sun, Zhongjie

AU - Tümer, Nihal

AU - Robert Cade, J.

AU - Hegland, Donald

AU - Yürekli, Muhittin

PY - 1994/1/1

Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - Chronic exposure to cold (5°C) is well known to increase both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in brown adipose tissue and systemic blood pressure. The effect of chronic dietary administration of the α-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, and the amino acid, L-arginine, on both the elevation of blood pressure during exposure to cold and on TH activity and expression of TH mRNA in the adrenal glands of rats was studied. As observed previously, chronic exposure to cold increased systolic blood pressure significantly and induced cardiac hypertrophy. Chronic dietary treatment with prazosin (8 mg/kg food) and arginine (20 g/kg food) returned blood pressure to control levels, did not affect body weight significantly, but failed to prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Both prazosin and L-arginine reduced the drinking response to administration of angiotensin II. Treatment with arginine and prazosin was accompanied by a significant increase in the urinary outputs of dopamine and L-DOPA. The 3 cold- treated groups (control, L-arginine and prazosin) had increases in plasma T3 and decreases in plasma T4 and plasma renin activity. Plasma concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine were increased significantly in the L-arginine-treated group. TH mRNA and TH activity in the adrenal glands were increased in the 3 cold-treated groups and these measures were correlated directly and significantly with plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations. Although both prazosin and arginine prevented the cold-induced elevation of blood pressure, they did not prevent the increase in TH mRNA, TH activity or epinephrine in plasma. The protective effect of arginine and prazosin in cold-induced hypertension may be related both to their reduction in plasma renin activity and to a reduced responsiveness to angiotensin II, as well as to their abilities to increase the secretion of dopamine.

AB - Chronic exposure to cold (5°C) is well known to increase both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in brown adipose tissue and systemic blood pressure. The effect of chronic dietary administration of the α-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, and the amino acid, L-arginine, on both the elevation of blood pressure during exposure to cold and on TH activity and expression of TH mRNA in the adrenal glands of rats was studied. As observed previously, chronic exposure to cold increased systolic blood pressure significantly and induced cardiac hypertrophy. Chronic dietary treatment with prazosin (8 mg/kg food) and arginine (20 g/kg food) returned blood pressure to control levels, did not affect body weight significantly, but failed to prevent cardiac hypertrophy. Both prazosin and L-arginine reduced the drinking response to administration of angiotensin II. Treatment with arginine and prazosin was accompanied by a significant increase in the urinary outputs of dopamine and L-DOPA. The 3 cold- treated groups (control, L-arginine and prazosin) had increases in plasma T3 and decreases in plasma T4 and plasma renin activity. Plasma concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine were increased significantly in the L-arginine-treated group. TH mRNA and TH activity in the adrenal glands were increased in the 3 cold-treated groups and these measures were correlated directly and significantly with plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations. Although both prazosin and arginine prevented the cold-induced elevation of blood pressure, they did not prevent the increase in TH mRNA, TH activity or epinephrine in plasma. The protective effect of arginine and prazosin in cold-induced hypertension may be related both to their reduction in plasma renin activity and to a reduced responsiveness to angiotensin II, as well as to their abilities to increase the secretion of dopamine.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027971661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027971661&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000139254

DO - 10.1159/000139254

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 351

EP - 362

JO - Pharmacology

JF - Pharmacology

SN - 0031-7012

IS - 6

ER -