Effect of continuous speech and non-speech signals on stuttering frequency in adults who stutter

Vikram N. Dayalu, Vijaya K. Guntupalli, Joseph Kalinowski, Andrew Stuart, Tim Saltuklaroglu, Michael P. Rastatter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The inhibitory effects of continuously presented audio signals (/a/, /s/, 1,000 Hz pure-tone) on stuttering were examined. Eleven adults who stutter participated. Participants read four 300-syllable passages (i.e. in the presence and absence of the audio signals). All of the audio signals induced a significant reduction in stuttering frequency relative to the control condition (P = 0.005). A significantly greater reduction in stuttering occurred in the /a/ condition (P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference between the /s/ and 1,000 Hz pure-tone conditions (P > 0.05). These findings are consistent with the notion that the percept of a second signal as speech or non-speech can respectively augment or attenuate the potency for reducing stuttering frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-127
Number of pages7
JournalLogopedics Phoniatrics Vocology
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Stuttering
Continuous Speech
Stutter

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Effect of continuous speech and non-speech signals on stuttering frequency in adults who stutter. / Dayalu, Vikram N.; Guntupalli, Vijaya K.; Kalinowski, Joseph; Stuart, Andrew; Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Rastatter, Michael P.

In: Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.10.2011, p. 121-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Dayalu, Vikram N. ; Guntupalli, Vijaya K. ; Kalinowski, Joseph ; Stuart, Andrew ; Saltuklaroglu, Tim ; Rastatter, Michael P. / Effect of continuous speech and non-speech signals on stuttering frequency in adults who stutter. In: Logopedics Phoniatrics Vocology. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 121-127.
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