Effect of diseases on response to Vitamin K antagonists

Timothy Self, Ryan E. Owens, Sami A. Sakaan, Jessica L. Wallace, Christopher W. Sands, Amanda Howard-Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction The purpose of this review article is to summarize the literature on diseases that are documented to have an effect on response to warfarin and other VKAs.Methods We searched the English literature from 1946 to September 2015 via PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus for the effect of diseases on response vitamin K antagonists including warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon, and fluindione.Discussion Among many factors modifying response to VKAs, several disease states are clinically relevant. Liver disease, hyperthyroidism, and CKD are well documented to increase response to VKAs. Decompensated heart failure, fever, and diarrhea may also elevate response to VKAs, but more study is needed. Hypothyroidism is associated with decreased effect of VKAs, and obese patients will likely require higher initial doses of VKAs.Conclusion In order to minimize risks with VKAs while ensuring efficacy, clinicians must be aware of the effect of disease states when prescribing these oral anticoagulants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-620
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Medical Research and Opinion
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2016

Fingerprint

Vitamin K
Warfarin
Acenocoumarol
Phenprocoumon
Literature
Hyperthyroidism
Hypothyroidism
PubMed
Anticoagulants
Liver Diseases
Diarrhea
Fever
Heart Failure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Self, T., Owens, R. E., Sakaan, S. A., Wallace, J. L., Sands, C. W., & Howard-Thompson, A. (2016). Effect of diseases on response to Vitamin K antagonists. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 32(4), 613-620. https://doi.org/10.1185/03007995.2015.1134464

Effect of diseases on response to Vitamin K antagonists. / Self, Timothy; Owens, Ryan E.; Sakaan, Sami A.; Wallace, Jessica L.; Sands, Christopher W.; Howard-Thompson, Amanda.

In: Current Medical Research and Opinion, Vol. 32, No. 4, 02.04.2016, p. 613-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Self, T, Owens, RE, Sakaan, SA, Wallace, JL, Sands, CW & Howard-Thompson, A 2016, 'Effect of diseases on response to Vitamin K antagonists', Current Medical Research and Opinion, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 613-620. https://doi.org/10.1185/03007995.2015.1134464
Self T, Owens RE, Sakaan SA, Wallace JL, Sands CW, Howard-Thompson A. Effect of diseases on response to Vitamin K antagonists. Current Medical Research and Opinion. 2016 Apr 2;32(4):613-620. https://doi.org/10.1185/03007995.2015.1134464
Self, Timothy ; Owens, Ryan E. ; Sakaan, Sami A. ; Wallace, Jessica L. ; Sands, Christopher W. ; Howard-Thompson, Amanda. / Effect of diseases on response to Vitamin K antagonists. In: Current Medical Research and Opinion. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 613-620.
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