Effect of Ferrule Location with Varying Heights on Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Restored Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors

Domingo Santos Pantaleón, Fabio M. Valenzuela, Brian R. Morrow, Cornelis H. Pameijer, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the effect of the location of a partial ferrule on 2 walls and the influence of ferrule height variations on remaining walls, fracture resistance, and failure mode of maxillary incisors endodontically treated and restored with fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Sixty intact human maxillary central incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 10): no ferrule (NF), 2-mm ferrule (CF2), absence of lingual wall and 1 proximal wall with remaining walls’ height, 1 mm (IF1), 2 mm (IF2), 3 mm (IF3), and 4 mm (IF4). They were restored with a fiberglass post and composite resin core. Complete metal crowns were then cemented on all specimens. Completed specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5°C/55°C) followed by the immediate testing of fracture resistance. After failure, the specimens were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated to identify the mode of failure. The data were analyzed with an ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). Results: An incomplete ferrule (IF2) with the lingual wall missing and 1 proximal wall had a fracture resistance of 494 ± 137 N, which was significantly less that of a complete ferrule (CF2) (707 ± 162 N, p = 0.002). An increase of 3 to 4 mm in height of the remaining walls had negligible influence on the fracture resistance: 514 ± 117 N (IF3), 557 ± 177 N (IF4). Partial decementation was observed in all specimens of IF3 and IF4, in 9 of IF1 and IF2, in 6 in NF, and in 3 in CF2. Root fractures occurred in 7 specimens, 4 in CF2, 1 in IF1, 1 in IF2, and 1 in IF4. Cracks under the cemento-enamel junction occurred in 4 specimens (NF and IF1), in 5 (IF2 and IF3), and in 6 (CF2 and IF4) and were considered catastrophic failures. Conclusions: Specimens with a complete ferrule of 2 mm height were more resistant to fracture than specimens with 2 mm height and absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall. A 3 or 4 mm wall height increase was associated with an insignificant increase in fracture resistance and cannot compensate for the absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-683
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Prosthodontics
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Incisor
Tongue
Composite Resins
Dental Enamel
Crowns
Analysis of Variance
Hot Temperature
Metals
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

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Effect of Ferrule Location with Varying Heights on Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Restored Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors. / Santos Pantaleón, Domingo; Valenzuela, Fabio M.; Morrow, Brian R.; Pameijer, Cornelis H.; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin.

In: Journal of Prosthodontics, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.07.2019, p. 677-683.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Santos Pantaleón, Domingo ; Valenzuela, Fabio M. ; Morrow, Brian R. ; Pameijer, Cornelis H. ; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin. / Effect of Ferrule Location with Varying Heights on Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Restored Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors. In: Journal of Prosthodontics. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 677-683.
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title = "Effect of Ferrule Location with Varying Heights on Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Restored Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors",
abstract = "Purpose: To investigate the effect of the location of a partial ferrule on 2 walls and the influence of ferrule height variations on remaining walls, fracture resistance, and failure mode of maxillary incisors endodontically treated and restored with fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Sixty intact human maxillary central incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 10): no ferrule (NF), 2-mm ferrule (CF2), absence of lingual wall and 1 proximal wall with remaining walls’ height, 1 mm (IF1), 2 mm (IF2), 3 mm (IF3), and 4 mm (IF4). They were restored with a fiberglass post and composite resin core. Complete metal crowns were then cemented on all specimens. Completed specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5°C/55°C) followed by the immediate testing of fracture resistance. After failure, the specimens were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated to identify the mode of failure. The data were analyzed with an ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). Results: An incomplete ferrule (IF2) with the lingual wall missing and 1 proximal wall had a fracture resistance of 494 ± 137 N, which was significantly less that of a complete ferrule (CF2) (707 ± 162 N, p = 0.002). An increase of 3 to 4 mm in height of the remaining walls had negligible influence on the fracture resistance: 514 ± 117 N (IF3), 557 ± 177 N (IF4). Partial decementation was observed in all specimens of IF3 and IF4, in 9 of IF1 and IF2, in 6 in NF, and in 3 in CF2. Root fractures occurred in 7 specimens, 4 in CF2, 1 in IF1, 1 in IF2, and 1 in IF4. Cracks under the cemento-enamel junction occurred in 4 specimens (NF and IF1), in 5 (IF2 and IF3), and in 6 (CF2 and IF4) and were considered catastrophic failures. Conclusions: Specimens with a complete ferrule of 2 mm height were more resistant to fracture than specimens with 2 mm height and absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall. A 3 or 4 mm wall height increase was associated with an insignificant increase in fracture resistance and cannot compensate for the absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall.",
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T1 - Effect of Ferrule Location with Varying Heights on Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Restored Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors

AU - Santos Pantaleón, Domingo

AU - Valenzuela, Fabio M.

AU - Morrow, Brian R.

AU - Pameijer, Cornelis H.

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Purpose: To investigate the effect of the location of a partial ferrule on 2 walls and the influence of ferrule height variations on remaining walls, fracture resistance, and failure mode of maxillary incisors endodontically treated and restored with fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Sixty intact human maxillary central incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 10): no ferrule (NF), 2-mm ferrule (CF2), absence of lingual wall and 1 proximal wall with remaining walls’ height, 1 mm (IF1), 2 mm (IF2), 3 mm (IF3), and 4 mm (IF4). They were restored with a fiberglass post and composite resin core. Complete metal crowns were then cemented on all specimens. Completed specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5°C/55°C) followed by the immediate testing of fracture resistance. After failure, the specimens were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated to identify the mode of failure. The data were analyzed with an ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). Results: An incomplete ferrule (IF2) with the lingual wall missing and 1 proximal wall had a fracture resistance of 494 ± 137 N, which was significantly less that of a complete ferrule (CF2) (707 ± 162 N, p = 0.002). An increase of 3 to 4 mm in height of the remaining walls had negligible influence on the fracture resistance: 514 ± 117 N (IF3), 557 ± 177 N (IF4). Partial decementation was observed in all specimens of IF3 and IF4, in 9 of IF1 and IF2, in 6 in NF, and in 3 in CF2. Root fractures occurred in 7 specimens, 4 in CF2, 1 in IF1, 1 in IF2, and 1 in IF4. Cracks under the cemento-enamel junction occurred in 4 specimens (NF and IF1), in 5 (IF2 and IF3), and in 6 (CF2 and IF4) and were considered catastrophic failures. Conclusions: Specimens with a complete ferrule of 2 mm height were more resistant to fracture than specimens with 2 mm height and absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall. A 3 or 4 mm wall height increase was associated with an insignificant increase in fracture resistance and cannot compensate for the absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall.

AB - Purpose: To investigate the effect of the location of a partial ferrule on 2 walls and the influence of ferrule height variations on remaining walls, fracture resistance, and failure mode of maxillary incisors endodontically treated and restored with fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Sixty intact human maxillary central incisors were divided into 6 groups (n = 10): no ferrule (NF), 2-mm ferrule (CF2), absence of lingual wall and 1 proximal wall with remaining walls’ height, 1 mm (IF1), 2 mm (IF2), 3 mm (IF3), and 4 mm (IF4). They were restored with a fiberglass post and composite resin core. Complete metal crowns were then cemented on all specimens. Completed specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5°C/55°C) followed by the immediate testing of fracture resistance. After failure, the specimens were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated to identify the mode of failure. The data were analyzed with an ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). Results: An incomplete ferrule (IF2) with the lingual wall missing and 1 proximal wall had a fracture resistance of 494 ± 137 N, which was significantly less that of a complete ferrule (CF2) (707 ± 162 N, p = 0.002). An increase of 3 to 4 mm in height of the remaining walls had negligible influence on the fracture resistance: 514 ± 117 N (IF3), 557 ± 177 N (IF4). Partial decementation was observed in all specimens of IF3 and IF4, in 9 of IF1 and IF2, in 6 in NF, and in 3 in CF2. Root fractures occurred in 7 specimens, 4 in CF2, 1 in IF1, 1 in IF2, and 1 in IF4. Cracks under the cemento-enamel junction occurred in 4 specimens (NF and IF1), in 5 (IF2 and IF3), and in 6 (CF2 and IF4) and were considered catastrophic failures. Conclusions: Specimens with a complete ferrule of 2 mm height were more resistant to fracture than specimens with 2 mm height and absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall. A 3 or 4 mm wall height increase was associated with an insignificant increase in fracture resistance and cannot compensate for the absence of the lingual wall and 1 proximal wall.

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JF - Journal of Prosthodontics

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