Effect of hypoalbuminemia and parenteral nutrition on free water excretion and electrolyte-free water resorption

S. L. Wojtysiak, R. O. Brown, D. Roberson, D. A. Powers, K. A. Kudsk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To measure the effect of human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition on serum albumin concentrations, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patients: Thirty adult, hypoalbuminemic patients who required parenteral nutrition. Interventions: Parenteral nutrition (control) or parenteral nutrition plus human albumin 25 g/L as a continuous infusion (treatment) for a 5-day study period. Measurements: On days 1 and 5, serum albumin concentration, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion were measured. Results: Serum albumin concentrations increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in both groups (control: 2.0 ± 0.1 [mean ± SEM] vs. 2.3 ± 0.1 g/dL [20 ± 1 vs. 23 ± 1 g/L], p = .02; treatment: 2.2 ± 0.1 vs. 3.5 ± 0.2 g/dL [22 ± 1 vs. 35 ± 2 g/L], p = .0001). Day 5 serum albumin concentrations were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with control (p = .0001). Colloid oncotic pressure increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in the treatment group (17.8 ± 0.8 vs. 25.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg, p = .0001), and was significantly higher than control at day 5 (p = .0001). No significant differences were found for free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion within or between groups. Conclusions: In hypoalbuminemic patients, human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition results in significant increases in serum albumin concentrations and colloid oncotic pressure, but has no apparent effect on free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-169
Number of pages6
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Hypoalbuminemia
Parenteral Nutrition
Electrolytes
Serum Albumin
Water
Colloids
Sodium
Pressure
Albumins
Therapeutics
Tertiary Care Centers
Randomized Controlled Trials
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Effect of hypoalbuminemia and parenteral nutrition on free water excretion and electrolyte-free water resorption. / Wojtysiak, S. L.; Brown, R. O.; Roberson, D.; Powers, D. A.; Kudsk, K. A.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.01.1992, p. 164-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wojtysiak, S. L. ; Brown, R. O. ; Roberson, D. ; Powers, D. A. ; Kudsk, K. A. / Effect of hypoalbuminemia and parenteral nutrition on free water excretion and electrolyte-free water resorption. In: Critical Care Medicine. 1992 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 164-169.
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abstract = "Objective: To measure the effect of human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition on serum albumin concentrations, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patients: Thirty adult, hypoalbuminemic patients who required parenteral nutrition. Interventions: Parenteral nutrition (control) or parenteral nutrition plus human albumin 25 g/L as a continuous infusion (treatment) for a 5-day study period. Measurements: On days 1 and 5, serum albumin concentration, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion were measured. Results: Serum albumin concentrations increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in both groups (control: 2.0 ± 0.1 [mean ± SEM] vs. 2.3 ± 0.1 g/dL [20 ± 1 vs. 23 ± 1 g/L], p = .02; treatment: 2.2 ± 0.1 vs. 3.5 ± 0.2 g/dL [22 ± 1 vs. 35 ± 2 g/L], p = .0001). Day 5 serum albumin concentrations were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with control (p = .0001). Colloid oncotic pressure increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in the treatment group (17.8 ± 0.8 vs. 25.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg, p = .0001), and was significantly higher than control at day 5 (p = .0001). No significant differences were found for free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion within or between groups. Conclusions: In hypoalbuminemic patients, human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition results in significant increases in serum albumin concentrations and colloid oncotic pressure, but has no apparent effect on free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion.",
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AU - Brown, R. O.

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AU - Powers, D. A.

AU - Kudsk, K. A.

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N2 - Objective: To measure the effect of human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition on serum albumin concentrations, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patients: Thirty adult, hypoalbuminemic patients who required parenteral nutrition. Interventions: Parenteral nutrition (control) or parenteral nutrition plus human albumin 25 g/L as a continuous infusion (treatment) for a 5-day study period. Measurements: On days 1 and 5, serum albumin concentration, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion were measured. Results: Serum albumin concentrations increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in both groups (control: 2.0 ± 0.1 [mean ± SEM] vs. 2.3 ± 0.1 g/dL [20 ± 1 vs. 23 ± 1 g/L], p = .02; treatment: 2.2 ± 0.1 vs. 3.5 ± 0.2 g/dL [22 ± 1 vs. 35 ± 2 g/L], p = .0001). Day 5 serum albumin concentrations were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with control (p = .0001). Colloid oncotic pressure increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in the treatment group (17.8 ± 0.8 vs. 25.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg, p = .0001), and was significantly higher than control at day 5 (p = .0001). No significant differences were found for free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion within or between groups. Conclusions: In hypoalbuminemic patients, human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition results in significant increases in serum albumin concentrations and colloid oncotic pressure, but has no apparent effect on free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion.

AB - Objective: To measure the effect of human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition on serum albumin concentrations, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion. Design: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patients: Thirty adult, hypoalbuminemic patients who required parenteral nutrition. Interventions: Parenteral nutrition (control) or parenteral nutrition plus human albumin 25 g/L as a continuous infusion (treatment) for a 5-day study period. Measurements: On days 1 and 5, serum albumin concentration, colloid oncotic pressure, free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, and sodium excretion were measured. Results: Serum albumin concentrations increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in both groups (control: 2.0 ± 0.1 [mean ± SEM] vs. 2.3 ± 0.1 g/dL [20 ± 1 vs. 23 ± 1 g/L], p = .02; treatment: 2.2 ± 0.1 vs. 3.5 ± 0.2 g/dL [22 ± 1 vs. 35 ± 2 g/L], p = .0001). Day 5 serum albumin concentrations were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with control (p = .0001). Colloid oncotic pressure increased significantly from day 1 to day 5 in the treatment group (17.8 ± 0.8 vs. 25.1 ± 1.0 mm Hg, p = .0001), and was significantly higher than control at day 5 (p = .0001). No significant differences were found for free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion within or between groups. Conclusions: In hypoalbuminemic patients, human albumin supplementation during parenteral nutrition results in significant increases in serum albumin concentrations and colloid oncotic pressure, but has no apparent effect on free water clearance, electrolyte-free water resorption, or sodium excretion.

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