Effect of lactic acid irrigant on shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface

Mohamed F. Ayad, Ali M. Farag, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effects of varied dilutions of lactic acid as a root canal irrigant and compare the shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface with other solutions deemed to be suitable root canal irrigants. Study design: The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molar teeth were ground wet and treated with one of the following irrigants: 1) no irrigant (control); 1) 5% hydrogen peroxide; 3) 5% sodium hypochlorite; 4) 15% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); 5) 10% lactic acid; or 6) 20% lactic acid. An additional specimen for each group was critical-point dried and freeze-fractured to evaluate the dentin surfaces after treatment by scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were treated with Epiphany primer, hollow steel tubes were placed on the dentin surfaces, and resin sealer (Epiphany) was applied to dentin inside the tubes. Specimens were stored in 100% humidity, then loaded to failure in a universal testing machine in the shear mode with a cross speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results: Dentin surface treatment resulted in significant differences for surface topography and shear bond strength of Epiphany sealer (P < .001). Lactic acid and EDTA significantly improved epiphany- dentin bond strengths when compared with other irrigants (P < .001). The highest mean (SD) bond strength was 1.95 (0.47) MPa for dentin surfaces treated with 20% lactic acid. The lowest mean bond strength [0.41 (0.29) MPa] was associated with untreated dentin surfaces. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the surface of the control specimens had a smear layer that contained smear plug material. Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite produced surfaces with a smear layer. Lactic acid solutions and EDTA, however, removed the dentinal smear layer but left remnants of smear plugs in the dentinal tubules. Conclusion: Lactic acid irrigant performed similarly to 15% EDTA and demonstrated higher bond strength of Epiphany sealer to dentin surface. Crown

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology
Volume109
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Shear Strength
Dentin
Adhesives
Lactic Acid
Smear Layer
Edetic Acid
Root Canal Irrigants
Sodium Hypochlorite
Hydrogen Peroxide
epiphany sealer
Steel
Humidity
Crowns
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Tooth
Electrons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Effect of lactic acid irrigant on shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the effects of varied dilutions of lactic acid as a root canal irrigant and compare the shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface with other solutions deemed to be suitable root canal irrigants. Study design: The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molar teeth were ground wet and treated with one of the following irrigants: 1) no irrigant (control); 1) 5{\%} hydrogen peroxide; 3) 5{\%} sodium hypochlorite; 4) 15{\%} ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); 5) 10{\%} lactic acid; or 6) 20{\%} lactic acid. An additional specimen for each group was critical-point dried and freeze-fractured to evaluate the dentin surfaces after treatment by scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were treated with Epiphany primer, hollow steel tubes were placed on the dentin surfaces, and resin sealer (Epiphany) was applied to dentin inside the tubes. Specimens were stored in 100{\%} humidity, then loaded to failure in a universal testing machine in the shear mode with a cross speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results: Dentin surface treatment resulted in significant differences for surface topography and shear bond strength of Epiphany sealer (P < .001). Lactic acid and EDTA significantly improved epiphany- dentin bond strengths when compared with other irrigants (P < .001). The highest mean (SD) bond strength was 1.95 (0.47) MPa for dentin surfaces treated with 20{\%} lactic acid. The lowest mean bond strength [0.41 (0.29) MPa] was associated with untreated dentin surfaces. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the surface of the control specimens had a smear layer that contained smear plug material. Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite produced surfaces with a smear layer. Lactic acid solutions and EDTA, however, removed the dentinal smear layer but left remnants of smear plugs in the dentinal tubules. Conclusion: Lactic acid irrigant performed similarly to 15{\%} EDTA and demonstrated higher bond strength of Epiphany sealer to dentin surface. Crown",
author = "Ayad, {Mohamed F.} and Farag, {Ali M.} and Franklin Garcia-Godoy",
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T1 - Effect of lactic acid irrigant on shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface

AU - Ayad, Mohamed F.

AU - Farag, Ali M.

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

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N2 - Objective: To examine the effects of varied dilutions of lactic acid as a root canal irrigant and compare the shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface with other solutions deemed to be suitable root canal irrigants. Study design: The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molar teeth were ground wet and treated with one of the following irrigants: 1) no irrigant (control); 1) 5% hydrogen peroxide; 3) 5% sodium hypochlorite; 4) 15% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); 5) 10% lactic acid; or 6) 20% lactic acid. An additional specimen for each group was critical-point dried and freeze-fractured to evaluate the dentin surfaces after treatment by scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were treated with Epiphany primer, hollow steel tubes were placed on the dentin surfaces, and resin sealer (Epiphany) was applied to dentin inside the tubes. Specimens were stored in 100% humidity, then loaded to failure in a universal testing machine in the shear mode with a cross speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results: Dentin surface treatment resulted in significant differences for surface topography and shear bond strength of Epiphany sealer (P < .001). Lactic acid and EDTA significantly improved epiphany- dentin bond strengths when compared with other irrigants (P < .001). The highest mean (SD) bond strength was 1.95 (0.47) MPa for dentin surfaces treated with 20% lactic acid. The lowest mean bond strength [0.41 (0.29) MPa] was associated with untreated dentin surfaces. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the surface of the control specimens had a smear layer that contained smear plug material. Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite produced surfaces with a smear layer. Lactic acid solutions and EDTA, however, removed the dentinal smear layer but left remnants of smear plugs in the dentinal tubules. Conclusion: Lactic acid irrigant performed similarly to 15% EDTA and demonstrated higher bond strength of Epiphany sealer to dentin surface. Crown

AB - Objective: To examine the effects of varied dilutions of lactic acid as a root canal irrigant and compare the shear bond strength of Epiphany adhesive sealer to human dentin surface with other solutions deemed to be suitable root canal irrigants. Study design: The occlusal surfaces of 60 extracted molar teeth were ground wet and treated with one of the following irrigants: 1) no irrigant (control); 1) 5% hydrogen peroxide; 3) 5% sodium hypochlorite; 4) 15% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); 5) 10% lactic acid; or 6) 20% lactic acid. An additional specimen for each group was critical-point dried and freeze-fractured to evaluate the dentin surfaces after treatment by scanning electron microscopy. Specimens were treated with Epiphany primer, hollow steel tubes were placed on the dentin surfaces, and resin sealer (Epiphany) was applied to dentin inside the tubes. Specimens were stored in 100% humidity, then loaded to failure in a universal testing machine in the shear mode with a cross speed of 0.05 mm/min. Results: Dentin surface treatment resulted in significant differences for surface topography and shear bond strength of Epiphany sealer (P < .001). Lactic acid and EDTA significantly improved epiphany- dentin bond strengths when compared with other irrigants (P < .001). The highest mean (SD) bond strength was 1.95 (0.47) MPa for dentin surfaces treated with 20% lactic acid. The lowest mean bond strength [0.41 (0.29) MPa] was associated with untreated dentin surfaces. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the surface of the control specimens had a smear layer that contained smear plug material. Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite produced surfaces with a smear layer. Lactic acid solutions and EDTA, however, removed the dentinal smear layer but left remnants of smear plugs in the dentinal tubules. Conclusion: Lactic acid irrigant performed similarly to 15% EDTA and demonstrated higher bond strength of Epiphany sealer to dentin surface. Crown

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