Effect of niacin, warfarin, and antioxidant therapy on coagulation parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease in the Arterial Disease Multiple Intervention Trial (ADMIT)

C. M. Chesney, Marshall Elam, J. A. Herd, K. B. Davis, R. Garg, D. Hunninghake, J. W. Kennedy, W. B. Applegate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have high rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, including that caused by associated coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Previous studies have shown that coagulation parameters are altered in PAD and that altered coagulation may play a critical role in the susceptibility to cardiovascular complications in PAD. It is therefore important to assess the effect of secondary prevention measures on coagulation in patients with PAD. The Arterial Disease Multiple Intervention Trial (ADMIT), a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, was conducted to determine the feasibility of a combined lipid-modifying, antioxidant, and antithrombotic treatment regimen in patients with PAD. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of the ADMIT interventions on coagulation. Methods: ADMIT participants were randomly assigned to low-dose warfarin, niacin, and antioxidant vitamin cocktail or corresponding placebos in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design. Specialized coagulation studies were performed in a subset of 80 ADMIT participants at baseline and after 12 months of treatment. Results: Low-dose warfarin (1 to 4 mg/d) resulted in a significant decrease in factor VIIc (P < .001) and in plasma F1.2 (P = .001). Unexpectedly, niacin treatment also resulted in significant decrease in both fibrinogen (48 mg/dL; P < .001) and F1.2 (P = .04). von Willebrand factor increased after antioxidant vitamin treatment (P = .04). Conclusions: A regimen of low-dose warfarin effectively modifies coagulation in patients with PAD. Niacin also favorably modifies fibrinogen and plasma F1.2. Niacin, in addition to its lipid effects, modifies abnormal coagulation factors that accompany PAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-636
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume140
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Niacin
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Warfarin
Antioxidants
Vitamins
Fibrinogen
Therapeutics
Placebos
Lipids
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Blood Coagulation Factors
von Willebrand Factor
Secondary Prevention
Multicenter Studies
Coronary Disease
Randomized Controlled Trials
Morbidity
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Effect of niacin, warfarin, and antioxidant therapy on coagulation parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease in the Arterial Disease Multiple Intervention Trial (ADMIT). / Chesney, C. M.; Elam, Marshall; Herd, J. A.; Davis, K. B.; Garg, R.; Hunninghake, D.; Kennedy, J. W.; Applegate, W. B.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 140, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 631-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chesney, C. M. ; Elam, Marshall ; Herd, J. A. ; Davis, K. B. ; Garg, R. ; Hunninghake, D. ; Kennedy, J. W. ; Applegate, W. B. / Effect of niacin, warfarin, and antioxidant therapy on coagulation parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease in the Arterial Disease Multiple Intervention Trial (ADMIT). In: American Heart Journal. 2000 ; Vol. 140, No. 4. pp. 631-636.
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AU - Elam, Marshall

AU - Herd, J. A.

AU - Davis, K. B.

AU - Garg, R.

AU - Hunninghake, D.

AU - Kennedy, J. W.

AU - Applegate, W. B.

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