Effect of obesity on cardiovascular disease risk factors in African American women

Queen Henry-Okafor, Patricia A. Cowan, Mona N. Wicks, Muriel Rice, Donna S. Husch, Michelle S.C. Khoo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is a growing health care concern with implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Obesity and CVD morbidity and mortality are highly prevalent among African American women. This pilot study examined the association between obesity and the traditional and emerging CVD risk factors in a sample of African American women. Participants comprised 48 women (27 obese, 21 normal weight) aged 18-45. with no known history of CVD. The women completed demographic and 7-day physical activity recall questionnaires. Height and weight were used to determine body mass index (BMI). Hypertension risk was assessed using the average of two resting blood pressure (BP) measurements. Lipid profile, blood glucose, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and E-selectin (eSel) levels were assessed using fasting blood samples. Laboratory findings were interpreted using the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III reference guidelines as well as manufacturers' reference ranges for the novel CVD risk factors. The most common traditional risk factors were physical inactivity (72.9%), positive family history of CVD (58.3%), and obesity (56.3%). Obese individuals had elevated systolic BP (p = .0002), diastolic BP (p = .0007) and HDL-cholesterol (p = .01), triglyceride (p=.02), hs-CRP (p = .002), and fibrinogen (p = .01), when compared with normal-weight women. The findings suggest an association between obesity and higher prevalence of both traditional and emerging CVD risk factors in young African American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-179
Number of pages9
JournalBiological Research For Nursing
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

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African Americans
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Blood Pressure
Weights and Measures
C-Reactive Protein
Fibrinogen
E-Selectin
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
HDL Cholesterol
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Reference Values
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Demography
Guidelines
Exercise
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Research and Theory

Cite this

Effect of obesity on cardiovascular disease risk factors in African American women. / Henry-Okafor, Queen; Cowan, Patricia A.; Wicks, Mona N.; Rice, Muriel; Husch, Donna S.; Khoo, Michelle S.C.

In: Biological Research For Nursing, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 171-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Henry-Okafor, Queen ; Cowan, Patricia A. ; Wicks, Mona N. ; Rice, Muriel ; Husch, Donna S. ; Khoo, Michelle S.C. / Effect of obesity on cardiovascular disease risk factors in African American women. In: Biological Research For Nursing. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 171-179.
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