Effect of occlusal calculus utilized as a potential "biological sealant" in special needs patients with gastric feeding tubes: a qualitative in vitro contrast to pit and fissure sealant restorations

Barry M. Owens, Harry K. Sharp, Emily E. Fourmy, Jeffrey Phebus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this case report and in vitro investigation was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of intact occlusal calculus of primary molars extracted from a special needs patient who received nutrition via a gastric feeding tube. An adolescent with a history of developmental disturbance presented for routine dental care in a hospital facility. Prophylaxis was performed, and 2 mandibular permanent molars were restored. Five primary molars were extracted due to mobility and delayed retention. Heavy deposits of intact calculus were present on the occlusal surfaces of the primary teeth. The extracted teeth were immersed in methylene blue dye solution, invested in acrylic resin, sectioned into blocks, and photographed at 20× and 40× magnification. Previously photographed calculus-free molars with pit and fissure sealants were reviewed and served as contrasting "restorations." The occlusal calculus on the primary teeth extracted from the patient absorbed the dye, while the comparison teeth containing pit and fissure sealants exhibited varying degrees of marginal dye penetration (microleakage). No marginal microleakage was noted in the calculus specimens, indicating that this substrate may serve as a "natural" occlusal surface sealant and that its removal from occlusal surfaces during routine oral prophylaxis may be unnecessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-29
Number of pages6
JournalGeneral Dentistry
Volume64
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pit and Fissure Sealants
Calculi
Enteral Nutrition
Coloring Agents
Deciduous Tooth
Tooth
Acrylic Resins
Dental Care
Methylene Blue
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

@article{aaee1bc6ae224134b72521b76af97840,
title = "Effect of occlusal calculus utilized as a potential {"}biological sealant{"} in special needs patients with gastric feeding tubes: a qualitative in vitro contrast to pit and fissure sealant restorations",
abstract = "The aim of this case report and in vitro investigation was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of intact occlusal calculus of primary molars extracted from a special needs patient who received nutrition via a gastric feeding tube. An adolescent with a history of developmental disturbance presented for routine dental care in a hospital facility. Prophylaxis was performed, and 2 mandibular permanent molars were restored. Five primary molars were extracted due to mobility and delayed retention. Heavy deposits of intact calculus were present on the occlusal surfaces of the primary teeth. The extracted teeth were immersed in methylene blue dye solution, invested in acrylic resin, sectioned into blocks, and photographed at 20× and 40× magnification. Previously photographed calculus-free molars with pit and fissure sealants were reviewed and served as contrasting {"}restorations.{"} The occlusal calculus on the primary teeth extracted from the patient absorbed the dye, while the comparison teeth containing pit and fissure sealants exhibited varying degrees of marginal dye penetration (microleakage). No marginal microleakage was noted in the calculus specimens, indicating that this substrate may serve as a {"}natural{"} occlusal surface sealant and that its removal from occlusal surfaces during routine oral prophylaxis may be unnecessary.",
author = "Owens, {Barry M.} and Sharp, {Harry K.} and Fourmy, {Emily E.} and Jeffrey Phebus",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "24--29",
journal = "General Dentistry",
issn = "0363-6771",
publisher = "Academy of General Dentistry",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of occlusal calculus utilized as a potential "biological sealant" in special needs patients with gastric feeding tubes

T2 - a qualitative in vitro contrast to pit and fissure sealant restorations

AU - Owens, Barry M.

AU - Sharp, Harry K.

AU - Fourmy, Emily E.

AU - Phebus, Jeffrey

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - The aim of this case report and in vitro investigation was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of intact occlusal calculus of primary molars extracted from a special needs patient who received nutrition via a gastric feeding tube. An adolescent with a history of developmental disturbance presented for routine dental care in a hospital facility. Prophylaxis was performed, and 2 mandibular permanent molars were restored. Five primary molars were extracted due to mobility and delayed retention. Heavy deposits of intact calculus were present on the occlusal surfaces of the primary teeth. The extracted teeth were immersed in methylene blue dye solution, invested in acrylic resin, sectioned into blocks, and photographed at 20× and 40× magnification. Previously photographed calculus-free molars with pit and fissure sealants were reviewed and served as contrasting "restorations." The occlusal calculus on the primary teeth extracted from the patient absorbed the dye, while the comparison teeth containing pit and fissure sealants exhibited varying degrees of marginal dye penetration (microleakage). No marginal microleakage was noted in the calculus specimens, indicating that this substrate may serve as a "natural" occlusal surface sealant and that its removal from occlusal surfaces during routine oral prophylaxis may be unnecessary.

AB - The aim of this case report and in vitro investigation was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of intact occlusal calculus of primary molars extracted from a special needs patient who received nutrition via a gastric feeding tube. An adolescent with a history of developmental disturbance presented for routine dental care in a hospital facility. Prophylaxis was performed, and 2 mandibular permanent molars were restored. Five primary molars were extracted due to mobility and delayed retention. Heavy deposits of intact calculus were present on the occlusal surfaces of the primary teeth. The extracted teeth were immersed in methylene blue dye solution, invested in acrylic resin, sectioned into blocks, and photographed at 20× and 40× magnification. Previously photographed calculus-free molars with pit and fissure sealants were reviewed and served as contrasting "restorations." The occlusal calculus on the primary teeth extracted from the patient absorbed the dye, while the comparison teeth containing pit and fissure sealants exhibited varying degrees of marginal dye penetration (microleakage). No marginal microleakage was noted in the calculus specimens, indicating that this substrate may serve as a "natural" occlusal surface sealant and that its removal from occlusal surfaces during routine oral prophylaxis may be unnecessary.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84980043245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84980043245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 27367629

AN - SCOPUS:84980043245

VL - 64

SP - 24

EP - 29

JO - General Dentistry

JF - General Dentistry

SN - 0363-6771

IS - 4

ER -