Effect of pharmacist intervention on herpes zoster vaccination in community pharmacies

Junling Wang, Lindsay J. Ford, La'Marcus Wingate, Sarah Frank Uroza, Nina Jaber, Cindy T. Smith, Richard Randolph, Steve Lane, Stephan L. Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of community pharmacy-based interventions in increasing vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine. Design: Prospective intervention study with a pre-post design. Setting: Three independent community pharmacies in Tennessee, from December 2007 to June 2008. Patients: Patients whose pharmacy profiles indicated that they were eligible for the vaccine and patients presenting to receive the vaccine at study sites. Intervention: Pharmacists promoted the herpes zoster vaccine through a press release published in local newspapers, a flyer accompanying each prescription dispensed at participating pharmacies, and a personalized letter mailed to patients whose pharmacy profiles indicated that they were eligible for the vaccine. Main outcome measures: Comparison of vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine during the control and intervention periods and patients' indication for their sources of education and influence in receiving the vaccine. Results: Vaccination rates increased from 0.37% (n = 59 of 16,121) during the control period to 1.20% (n = 193 of 16,062) during the intervention period (P < 0.0001). Cochran-Armitage trend analyses, including the months before and after the interventions, confirmed a significantly higher vaccination rate during the intervention month than other months analyzed. More patients indicated that they were educated about the herpes zoster vaccine by one of the pharmacist-driven interventions than by a physician, family/friend, or other source during the intervention period (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Also, more patients were influenced to receive the vaccination as a result of one of the pharmacist-driven interventions than influenced by a physician (P = 0.0260) or other source (P < 0.0001). No difference in the effectiveness of patient influence was found when the pharmacy interventions were compared with family/friends (P = 0.1025). Conclusion: Three pharmacist-driven interventions were effective in increasing vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-53
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Herpes Zoster Vaccine
Pharmacies
Herpes Zoster
Pharmacists
Vaccination
Vaccines
Newspapers
Education
Family Physicians
Prescriptions
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Effect of pharmacist intervention on herpes zoster vaccination in community pharmacies. / Wang, Junling; Ford, Lindsay J.; Wingate, La'Marcus; Uroza, Sarah Frank; Jaber, Nina; Smith, Cindy T.; Randolph, Richard; Lane, Steve; Foster, Stephan L.

In: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 46-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, J, Ford, LJ, Wingate, LM, Uroza, SF, Jaber, N, Smith, CT, Randolph, R, Lane, S & Foster, SL 2013, 'Effect of pharmacist intervention on herpes zoster vaccination in community pharmacies', Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 46-53. https://doi.org/10.1331/JAPhA.2013.12019
Wang, Junling ; Ford, Lindsay J. ; Wingate, La'Marcus ; Uroza, Sarah Frank ; Jaber, Nina ; Smith, Cindy T. ; Randolph, Richard ; Lane, Steve ; Foster, Stephan L. / Effect of pharmacist intervention on herpes zoster vaccination in community pharmacies. In: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association. 2013 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 46-53.
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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of community pharmacy-based interventions in increasing vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine. Design: Prospective intervention study with a pre-post design. Setting: Three independent community pharmacies in Tennessee, from December 2007 to June 2008. Patients: Patients whose pharmacy profiles indicated that they were eligible for the vaccine and patients presenting to receive the vaccine at study sites. Intervention: Pharmacists promoted the herpes zoster vaccine through a press release published in local newspapers, a flyer accompanying each prescription dispensed at participating pharmacies, and a personalized letter mailed to patients whose pharmacy profiles indicated that they were eligible for the vaccine. Main outcome measures: Comparison of vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine during the control and intervention periods and patients' indication for their sources of education and influence in receiving the vaccine. Results: Vaccination rates increased from 0.37{\%} (n = 59 of 16,121) during the control period to 1.20{\%} (n = 193 of 16,062) during the intervention period (P < 0.0001). Cochran-Armitage trend analyses, including the months before and after the interventions, confirmed a significantly higher vaccination rate during the intervention month than other months analyzed. More patients indicated that they were educated about the herpes zoster vaccine by one of the pharmacist-driven interventions than by a physician, family/friend, or other source during the intervention period (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Also, more patients were influenced to receive the vaccination as a result of one of the pharmacist-driven interventions than influenced by a physician (P = 0.0260) or other source (P < 0.0001). No difference in the effectiveness of patient influence was found when the pharmacy interventions were compared with family/friends (P = 0.1025). Conclusion: Three pharmacist-driven interventions were effective in increasing vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine.",
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AB - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of community pharmacy-based interventions in increasing vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine. Design: Prospective intervention study with a pre-post design. Setting: Three independent community pharmacies in Tennessee, from December 2007 to June 2008. Patients: Patients whose pharmacy profiles indicated that they were eligible for the vaccine and patients presenting to receive the vaccine at study sites. Intervention: Pharmacists promoted the herpes zoster vaccine through a press release published in local newspapers, a flyer accompanying each prescription dispensed at participating pharmacies, and a personalized letter mailed to patients whose pharmacy profiles indicated that they were eligible for the vaccine. Main outcome measures: Comparison of vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine during the control and intervention periods and patients' indication for their sources of education and influence in receiving the vaccine. Results: Vaccination rates increased from 0.37% (n = 59 of 16,121) during the control period to 1.20% (n = 193 of 16,062) during the intervention period (P < 0.0001). Cochran-Armitage trend analyses, including the months before and after the interventions, confirmed a significantly higher vaccination rate during the intervention month than other months analyzed. More patients indicated that they were educated about the herpes zoster vaccine by one of the pharmacist-driven interventions than by a physician, family/friend, or other source during the intervention period (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Also, more patients were influenced to receive the vaccination as a result of one of the pharmacist-driven interventions than influenced by a physician (P = 0.0260) or other source (P < 0.0001). No difference in the effectiveness of patient influence was found when the pharmacy interventions were compared with family/friends (P = 0.1025). Conclusion: Three pharmacist-driven interventions were effective in increasing vaccination rates for the herpes zoster vaccine.

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