Effect of rejuvenation hormones on spermatogenesis

Jared L. Moss, Lindsey E. Crosnoe, Edward Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review the current literature for the effect of hormones used in rejuvenation clinics on the maintenance of spermatogenesis. Design: Review of published literature. Setting: Not applicable. Patient(s): Men who have undergone exogenous testosterone (T) and/or anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) therapies. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Semen analysis, pregnancy outcomes, and time to recovery of spermatogenesis. Result(s): Exogenous testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids suppress intratesticular testosterone production, which may lead to azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. Therapies that protect spermatogenesis involve human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) therapy and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). The studies examining the effect of human growth hormone (HGH) on infertile men are uncontrolled and unconvincing, but they do not appear to negatively impact spermatogenesis. At present, routine use of aromatase inhibitors is not recommended based on a lack of long-term data. Conclusion(s): The use of hormones for rejuvenation is increasing with the aging of the Baby Boomer population. Men desiring children at a later age may be unaware of the side-effect profile of hormones used at rejuvenation centers. Testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids have well-established detrimental effects on spermatogenesis, but recovery may be possible with cessation. Clomiphene citrate, human growth hormone (HGH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and aromatase inhibitors do not appear to have significant negative effects on sperm production, but quality data are lacking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1814-1820
Number of pages7
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume99
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Rejuvenation
Spermatogenesis
Testosterone Congeners
Hormones
Testosterone
Aromatase Inhibitors
Human Growth Hormone
Chorionic Gonadotropin
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
Oligospermia
Azoospermia
Clomiphene
Semen Analysis
Somatomedins
Pregnancy Outcome
Spermatozoa
Therapeutics
Maintenance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Effect of rejuvenation hormones on spermatogenesis. / Moss, Jared L.; Crosnoe, Lindsey E.; Kim, Edward.

In: Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 99, No. 7, 01.06.2013, p. 1814-1820.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Moss, Jared L. ; Crosnoe, Lindsey E. ; Kim, Edward. / Effect of rejuvenation hormones on spermatogenesis. In: Fertility and Sterility. 2013 ; Vol. 99, No. 7. pp. 1814-1820.
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