Effect of skeletal muscle layer modeling on cardiac damage estimates during transthoracic defibrillation

Amy Curry, F. J. Claydon

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The objective of this study is to examine how modeling the skeletal muscle layer affects computed estimates of cardiac damage during transthoracic defibrillation. The study is implemented with a physiologically realistic 3-D volume conductor model of the human thorax. The model computes current density distributions within the heart from a knowledge of defibrillation shock strength, defibrillation electrode location, and the relative conductivities of the interior thorax. Cardiac damage estimates are based on achieving 95% critical mass during a defibrillation shock. Solutions have been constructed for three sets of skeletal muscle conductivities that are widely used in the literature. The results for anterior-posterior, precordial, and right-left defibrillation electrode configurations indicate that computed estimates of cardiac damage vary by as much as 85%, 23%, and 18%, respectively. These results strongly suggest that computed estimates for cardiac damage during a defibrillation shock are dependent on the conductivity values chosen for the skeletal muscle layer, and therefore estimates of cardiac damage at present are limited to realistic ranges rather than precise determination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-322
Number of pages2
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1995
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1995 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 17th Annual Conference and 21st Canadian Medical and Biological Engineering Conference. Part 2 (of 2) - Montreal, Can
Duration: Sep 20 1995Sep 23 1995

Fingerprint

Muscle
Shock
Skeletal Muscle
Electrodes
Thorax
Interiors (building)
Current density

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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abstract = "The objective of this study is to examine how modeling the skeletal muscle layer affects computed estimates of cardiac damage during transthoracic defibrillation. The study is implemented with a physiologically realistic 3-D volume conductor model of the human thorax. The model computes current density distributions within the heart from a knowledge of defibrillation shock strength, defibrillation electrode location, and the relative conductivities of the interior thorax. Cardiac damage estimates are based on achieving 95{\%} critical mass during a defibrillation shock. Solutions have been constructed for three sets of skeletal muscle conductivities that are widely used in the literature. The results for anterior-posterior, precordial, and right-left defibrillation electrode configurations indicate that computed estimates of cardiac damage vary by as much as 85{\%}, 23{\%}, and 18{\%}, respectively. These results strongly suggest that computed estimates for cardiac damage during a defibrillation shock are dependent on the conductivity values chosen for the skeletal muscle layer, and therefore estimates of cardiac damage at present are limited to realistic ranges rather than precise determination.",
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