Effect of storage media on the fluoride release and surface microhardness of four polyacid-modified composite resins ("compomers")

W. Geurtsen, G. Leyhausen, Franklin Garcia-Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. The aims of this investigation were to measure the surface microhardness (Vickers) as well as the release of fluoride from four polyacid-modified composite resins (PMC) ("compomers") (Compoglass F, F 2000, Dyract AP, experimental compomer) after storage in various artificial saliva (buffers) including one esterase-buffer. Methods. Samples were stored for 6 days in de-ionized water, acidic buffer I (pH 4.2), neutral buffer II (pH 7.0), or neutral buffer III (pH 7.0) containing porcine esterase. The specimens were transferred into fresh media every 48 h. Fluoride release was measured every 48 h. Vickers hardness of each five samples of every group was determined before storing the samples in media (baseline) as well as after storage for 24, 48, and 144 h in the various solutions. Dry-stored specimens served as control. Results. The surface microhardness of all PMCs significantly decreased after storage in the various media. No significant differences, however, were found between samples of the same material stored in the various media for 6 days. In general, the highest fluoride quantity was released into the acidic buffer I except for Dyract AP, which segregated similar quantities of fluoride into buffer I and into de-ionized water. More fluoride was released into de-ionized water than into neutral buffers. Further, esterase treatment increased fluoride release from three PMCs. Significance. Our results suggest that the action of salivary esterases may weaken the surface of polyacid-modified composite resin restorations. As a clinical consequence, wear may be enhanced and load resistance may be reduced. In addition, fluoride release from PMCs may be increased by hydrolytic enzymes in saliva and under acidic conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-201
Number of pages6
JournalDental Materials
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Compomers
Fluorides
Microhardness
Buffers
Resins
Composite materials
Esterases
Water
Vickers hardness
Restoration
Enzymes
Wear of materials
Artificial Saliva
Hardness
Saliva
Swine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Effect of storage media on the fluoride release and surface microhardness of four polyacid-modified composite resins ("compomers"). / Geurtsen, W.; Leyhausen, G.; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin.

In: Dental Materials, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 196-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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