Effect of Surface Roughness of Cavity Preparations on the Microleakage of Class V Resin Composite Restorations

L. W. Shook, E. W. Turner, Judith Ross, Mark Scarbecz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study determined whether surface roughness of the internal walls of a Class V resin composite preparation, using a carbide bur, a medium-grit diamond bur and a fine-grit diamond bur, affected the degree of microleakage of the restoration. The facial and lingual surfaces of 45 non-carious extracted human molars provided 90 samples for evaluation. The specimen surfaces were assigned randomly in equal numbers to one of three groups (n=30). Conservative Class V composite preparations were made using one of three different burs: a 330-carbide bur, a 330 fine-grit diamond bur or a 330 medium-grit diamond bur (Brasseler USA). After acid etching, PQ1 (Ultradent Products Inc) primer/ bonding resin and Vitalescence (Ultradent Products Inc) were applied and cured following the manufacturers' instructions. After minor finishing, the apices of all root surfaces were sealed with Vitrebond (3M), and the unprepared external surfaces were sealed with nail polish to within 1 mm of the restoration margins. The specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, then subjected to 1,200 thermocycles at 5°C and 55°C with a 30-second dwell time. After cycling, the teeth were immersed in a 5% solution of methylene blue dye for 12 hours. The molars were invested in clear acrylic casting resin, labeled, then sectioned once vertically approximately midway through the facial and lingual surfaces using a diamond coated saw blade. Microleakage was evaluated using a 10x microscope for the enamel and cementum surfaces and blindly scored by two independent examiners. In all cases, regardless of the examiner, at both the enamel and the dentin margins, the analysis revealed no statistically significant differences in microleakage across bur types. Further results show that dentin margins leaked significantly more than enamel margins for all bur types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-785
Number of pages7
JournalOperative Dentistry
Volume28
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 2003

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Diamond
Composite Resins
Dental Enamel
Dentin
Tongue
Industrial Oils
Dental Cementum
Acrylic Resins
Methylene Blue
Nails
Tooth
Coloring Agents
Temperature
Acids
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Effect of Surface Roughness of Cavity Preparations on the Microleakage of Class V Resin Composite Restorations. / Shook, L. W.; Turner, E. W.; Ross, Judith; Scarbecz, Mark.

In: Operative Dentistry, Vol. 28, No. 6, 11.2003, p. 779-785.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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