Effectiveness of and Dental Student Satisfaction with Three Teaching Methods for Behavior Guidance Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry

Chad M. Slaven, Martha Wells, Edward J. DeSchepper, Larry Dormois, Craig V. Vinall, Kristen Douglas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different types of instructional styles-traditional lecture with and without video examples and contemporary format that simulated a flipped classroom-on dental students' learning of behavior guidance techniques (BGTs) in pediatric dentistry. The study also sought to determine if students had an improved comfort level with BGTs with these instructional methods, if videos improved learning and comfort with BGTs, and if there were differences in outcomes by gender. All 96 second-year dental students at one U.S. dental school were recruited to participate in the study in 2017. Students were randomly divided into three groups: contemporary instruction (CI), traditional instruction with video (TIV), and traditional instruction with no video (TI). CI students watched a 20-minute mini-lecture and were divided into discussion groups led by calibrated faculty members. TIV students received 50 minutes of traditional lecture with video examples. TI students received a traditional lecture with no video examples. All groups completed a questionnaire prior to and on completion of the course. The questionnaire assessed students' learning and perceptions of the learning experience. All students participated in the course and the assessments, for a 100% response rate. The students' post-course scores improved for all teaching methods (TI>CI>TIV) with no significant differences among them. CI students rated comfort with BGTs and usefulness of videos higher than the other groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. Students rated their satisfaction with and usefulness of the course high for all groups (>3 on a four-point scale). Learning style and comfort treating children were not statistically significant by gender. Overall, the students reported high satisfaction with all the teaching methods. Although the differences were not statistically significant, discussion groups were ranked highest in satisfaction and usefulness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)966-972
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of dental education
Volume83
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Fingerprint

Educational Technology
Pediatric Dentistry
Dental Education
Dental Students
dentistry
educational technology
teaching method
Teaching
Students
video
instruction
student
Learning
learning
group discussion
Group
Dental Schools
questionnaire
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Effectiveness of and Dental Student Satisfaction with Three Teaching Methods for Behavior Guidance Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry. / Slaven, Chad M.; Wells, Martha; DeSchepper, Edward J.; Dormois, Larry; Vinall, Craig V.; Douglas, Kristen.

In: Journal of dental education, Vol. 83, No. 8, 01.08.2019, p. 966-972.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slaven, Chad M. ; Wells, Martha ; DeSchepper, Edward J. ; Dormois, Larry ; Vinall, Craig V. ; Douglas, Kristen. / Effectiveness of and Dental Student Satisfaction with Three Teaching Methods for Behavior Guidance Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry. In: Journal of dental education. 2019 ; Vol. 83, No. 8. pp. 966-972.
@article{0e7dba0af08f4f7daba051fcb588ad14,
title = "Effectiveness of and Dental Student Satisfaction with Three Teaching Methods for Behavior Guidance Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different types of instructional styles-traditional lecture with and without video examples and contemporary format that simulated a flipped classroom-on dental students' learning of behavior guidance techniques (BGTs) in pediatric dentistry. The study also sought to determine if students had an improved comfort level with BGTs with these instructional methods, if videos improved learning and comfort with BGTs, and if there were differences in outcomes by gender. All 96 second-year dental students at one U.S. dental school were recruited to participate in the study in 2017. Students were randomly divided into three groups: contemporary instruction (CI), traditional instruction with video (TIV), and traditional instruction with no video (TI). CI students watched a 20-minute mini-lecture and were divided into discussion groups led by calibrated faculty members. TIV students received 50 minutes of traditional lecture with video examples. TI students received a traditional lecture with no video examples. All groups completed a questionnaire prior to and on completion of the course. The questionnaire assessed students' learning and perceptions of the learning experience. All students participated in the course and the assessments, for a 100{\%} response rate. The students' post-course scores improved for all teaching methods (TI>CI>TIV) with no significant differences among them. CI students rated comfort with BGTs and usefulness of videos higher than the other groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. Students rated their satisfaction with and usefulness of the course high for all groups (>3 on a four-point scale). Learning style and comfort treating children were not statistically significant by gender. Overall, the students reported high satisfaction with all the teaching methods. Although the differences were not statistically significant, discussion groups were ranked highest in satisfaction and usefulness.",
author = "Slaven, {Chad M.} and Martha Wells and DeSchepper, {Edward J.} and Larry Dormois and Vinall, {Craig V.} and Kristen Douglas",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.21815/JDE.019.091",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "83",
pages = "966--972",
journal = "Journal of Dental Education",
issn = "0022-0337",
publisher = "American Dental Education Association",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effectiveness of and Dental Student Satisfaction with Three Teaching Methods for Behavior Guidance Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry

AU - Slaven, Chad M.

AU - Wells, Martha

AU - DeSchepper, Edward J.

AU - Dormois, Larry

AU - Vinall, Craig V.

AU - Douglas, Kristen

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different types of instructional styles-traditional lecture with and without video examples and contemporary format that simulated a flipped classroom-on dental students' learning of behavior guidance techniques (BGTs) in pediatric dentistry. The study also sought to determine if students had an improved comfort level with BGTs with these instructional methods, if videos improved learning and comfort with BGTs, and if there were differences in outcomes by gender. All 96 second-year dental students at one U.S. dental school were recruited to participate in the study in 2017. Students were randomly divided into three groups: contemporary instruction (CI), traditional instruction with video (TIV), and traditional instruction with no video (TI). CI students watched a 20-minute mini-lecture and were divided into discussion groups led by calibrated faculty members. TIV students received 50 minutes of traditional lecture with video examples. TI students received a traditional lecture with no video examples. All groups completed a questionnaire prior to and on completion of the course. The questionnaire assessed students' learning and perceptions of the learning experience. All students participated in the course and the assessments, for a 100% response rate. The students' post-course scores improved for all teaching methods (TI>CI>TIV) with no significant differences among them. CI students rated comfort with BGTs and usefulness of videos higher than the other groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. Students rated their satisfaction with and usefulness of the course high for all groups (>3 on a four-point scale). Learning style and comfort treating children were not statistically significant by gender. Overall, the students reported high satisfaction with all the teaching methods. Although the differences were not statistically significant, discussion groups were ranked highest in satisfaction and usefulness.

AB - The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different types of instructional styles-traditional lecture with and without video examples and contemporary format that simulated a flipped classroom-on dental students' learning of behavior guidance techniques (BGTs) in pediatric dentistry. The study also sought to determine if students had an improved comfort level with BGTs with these instructional methods, if videos improved learning and comfort with BGTs, and if there were differences in outcomes by gender. All 96 second-year dental students at one U.S. dental school were recruited to participate in the study in 2017. Students were randomly divided into three groups: contemporary instruction (CI), traditional instruction with video (TIV), and traditional instruction with no video (TI). CI students watched a 20-minute mini-lecture and were divided into discussion groups led by calibrated faculty members. TIV students received 50 minutes of traditional lecture with video examples. TI students received a traditional lecture with no video examples. All groups completed a questionnaire prior to and on completion of the course. The questionnaire assessed students' learning and perceptions of the learning experience. All students participated in the course and the assessments, for a 100% response rate. The students' post-course scores improved for all teaching methods (TI>CI>TIV) with no significant differences among them. CI students rated comfort with BGTs and usefulness of videos higher than the other groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. Students rated their satisfaction with and usefulness of the course high for all groups (>3 on a four-point scale). Learning style and comfort treating children were not statistically significant by gender. Overall, the students reported high satisfaction with all the teaching methods. Although the differences were not statistically significant, discussion groups were ranked highest in satisfaction and usefulness.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071059258&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071059258&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.21815/JDE.019.091

DO - 10.21815/JDE.019.091

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 966

EP - 972

JO - Journal of Dental Education

JF - Journal of Dental Education

SN - 0022-0337

IS - 8

ER -