Effectiveness of vaginal delivery simulation in novice trainees

Kristina Shumard, Jeffrey M. Denney, Kristen Quinn, Arnold S. Grandis, Paul W. Whitecar, John Bailey, Rubymel J. Jijon-Knupp, Chenchen Huang, Kendra Kesty, Brian C. Brost, Joshua F. Nitsche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Simulation training has been demonstrated to increase medical student confidence with vaginal deliveries; however, effect on skill performance is still lacking. To determine if integration of simulation training into the OB/GYN clerkship improves performance of vaginal deliveries, we assessed the effectiveness of simulation in third-year medical students. METHODS: During the OB/GYN clerkship, third-year students were assigned to receive vaginal delivery simulation (n=54) or cervical exam simulation (n=56), with each group serving as a simulation naïve control for the other skill. As a final assessment of their skill, students performed a simulated vaginal delivery scored by a blinded observer using a procedural checklist (score 0-30). A satisfactory score was considered 26 or greater. The individual scores and percentage of satisfactory scores were compared between both groups using a Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test, respectively. RESULTS: Vaginal delivery students had a significantly higher mean score (27 +/- 3.2) and percentage of students achieving a passing score (85%) than the cervical exam students (22 +/- 3.5 and 15%). There were no differences in vaginal delivery performance based on gender, nor was there any difference in the number of real-life deliveries performed between vaginal delivery and cervical exam students. CONCLUSIONS: Even though medical students had an equivalent clinical rotation experience, a short period of simulation training had a marked effect on their end-of-rotation performance. During initial resident or midwife training more than 5 hours of simulation will likely be required to properly prepare 100% of trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)696-702
Number of pages7
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume48
Issue number9
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Students
Medical Students
Midwifery
Chi-Square Distribution
Nonparametric Statistics
Checklist
Simulation Training

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Shumard, K., Denney, J. M., Quinn, K., Grandis, A. S., Whitecar, P. W., Bailey, J., ... Nitsche, J. F. (2016). Effectiveness of vaginal delivery simulation in novice trainees. Family Medicine, 48(9), 696-702.

Effectiveness of vaginal delivery simulation in novice trainees. / Shumard, Kristina; Denney, Jeffrey M.; Quinn, Kristen; Grandis, Arnold S.; Whitecar, Paul W.; Bailey, John; Jijon-Knupp, Rubymel J.; Huang, Chenchen; Kesty, Kendra; Brost, Brian C.; Nitsche, Joshua F.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 9, 01.10.2016, p. 696-702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shumard, K, Denney, JM, Quinn, K, Grandis, AS, Whitecar, PW, Bailey, J, Jijon-Knupp, RJ, Huang, C, Kesty, K, Brost, BC & Nitsche, JF 2016, 'Effectiveness of vaginal delivery simulation in novice trainees', Family Medicine, vol. 48, no. 9, pp. 696-702.
Shumard K, Denney JM, Quinn K, Grandis AS, Whitecar PW, Bailey J et al. Effectiveness of vaginal delivery simulation in novice trainees. Family Medicine. 2016 Oct 1;48(9):696-702.
Shumard, Kristina ; Denney, Jeffrey M. ; Quinn, Kristen ; Grandis, Arnold S. ; Whitecar, Paul W. ; Bailey, John ; Jijon-Knupp, Rubymel J. ; Huang, Chenchen ; Kesty, Kendra ; Brost, Brian C. ; Nitsche, Joshua F. / Effectiveness of vaginal delivery simulation in novice trainees. In: Family Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 48, No. 9. pp. 696-702.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Simulation training has been demonstrated to increase medical student confidence with vaginal deliveries; however, effect on skill performance is still lacking. To determine if integration of simulation training into the OB/GYN clerkship improves performance of vaginal deliveries, we assessed the effectiveness of simulation in third-year medical students. METHODS: During the OB/GYN clerkship, third-year students were assigned to receive vaginal delivery simulation (n=54) or cervical exam simulation (n=56), with each group serving as a simulation na{\"i}ve control for the other skill. As a final assessment of their skill, students performed a simulated vaginal delivery scored by a blinded observer using a procedural checklist (score 0-30). A satisfactory score was considered 26 or greater. The individual scores and percentage of satisfactory scores were compared between both groups using a Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test, respectively. RESULTS: Vaginal delivery students had a significantly higher mean score (27 +/- 3.2) and percentage of students achieving a passing score (85{\%}) than the cervical exam students (22 +/- 3.5 and 15{\%}). There were no differences in vaginal delivery performance based on gender, nor was there any difference in the number of real-life deliveries performed between vaginal delivery and cervical exam students. CONCLUSIONS: Even though medical students had an equivalent clinical rotation experience, a short period of simulation training had a marked effect on their end-of-rotation performance. During initial resident or midwife training more than 5 hours of simulation will likely be required to properly prepare 100{\%} of trainees.",
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