Effects of a bleaching agent on human gingival fibroblasts

David Tipton, S. D. Braxton, M. K. Dabbous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mild oxygenating agents generating low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are effective alternatives to heat-activated 30% H2O2 in bleaching discolored, vital teeth. There are concerns about possible pathological effects of long-term exposure to bleaching agents, and irritation and ulceration of the gingiva and other oral soft tissues can occur. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of one of these agents on gingival fibroblasts in vitro. Microscopic examination revealed that concentrations of 0.05% to 0.025% of the agent appeared to kill most of the cells. At concentrations of 0.025% to 0.017% some morphological changes were noted; the cells appeared normal at concentrations of ≤0.0125%. The agent significantly (P ≤ 0.002) decreased proliferation (measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into cellular DNA) at concentrations as low as 0.006%. The agent also had a dose-dependent effect on fibronectin production, measured by ELISA, causing significant (P ≤ 0.03) decreases at concentrations as low as 0.017%. The agent significantly decreased the production of types I (P ≤ 0.01) and III (P ≤ 0.04) collagens (measured by ELISA) at concentrations as low as 0.0125%. Type V collagen was not detected under any conditions. Catalase, which catalizes the breakdown of H2O2, abolished toxic effects of a 0.05% solution. The results show that in vitro, the agent is toxic to human gingival fibroblasts, inhibiting several cellular functions. Taken together, the findings of the study suggest that while the agent is toxic to gingival fibroblasts in vitro, enzymes in the oral environment which destroy H2O2 may protect oral tissues and their component cells in vivo from the potential toxic effects of the agent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-13
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Periodontology
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Bleaching Agents
Poisons
Fibroblasts
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Collagen Type V
Gingiva
Cellular Structures
Fibronectins
Catalase
Thymidine
Hydrogen Peroxide
Tooth
Collagen
Hot Temperature
DNA
Enzymes
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Periodontics

Cite this

Effects of a bleaching agent on human gingival fibroblasts. / Tipton, David; Braxton, S. D.; Dabbous, M. K.

In: Journal of Periodontology, Vol. 66, No. 1, 01.01.1995, p. 7-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tipton, David ; Braxton, S. D. ; Dabbous, M. K. / Effects of a bleaching agent on human gingival fibroblasts. In: Journal of Periodontology. 1995 ; Vol. 66, No. 1. pp. 7-13.
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