Effects of birth cohort and age on body composition in a sample of community-based elderly

Jingzhong Ding, Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Anne B. Newman, Dennis R. Taaffe, Barbara J. Nicklas, Marjolein Visser, Sun Lee Jung, Michael Nevitt, Frances Tylavsky, Susan M. Rubin, Marco Pahor, Tamara B. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The effect of the recent obesity epidemic on body composition remains unknown. Furthermore, age-related changes in body composition are still unclear. Objective: The objective was to simultaneously examine the effects of birth cohort and age on body composition. Design: A total of 1786 well-functioning, community-based whites and blacks (52% women and 35% blacks) aged 70-79 y from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study underwent dualenergy X-ray absorptiometry annually from 1997 to 2003. Results: At baseline, mean ± SD percentage body fat, fat mass, and lean mass (bone-free) were 28 ± 5%, 24 ± 7 kg, and 56 ± 7 kg, respectively, for men and 39 ± 6%, 28 ± 9 kg, and 40 ± 6 kg for women. Mixed models were used to assess the effects of cohort and age-related changes on body composition. Later cohorts in men had a greater percentage body fat (0.32% per birth year, P < 0.0001) than did earlier cohorts. This cohort effect was due to a greater increase in fat mass than in lean mass (0.45 kg and 0.17 kg/birth year, respectively). With increasing age, percentage body fat in men initially increased and then leveled off. This age-related change was due to an accelerated decrease in lean mass and an initial increase and a later decrease in fat mass. Similar but less extreme effects of cohort and age were observed in women. Conclusions: The combination of effects of both birth cohort and age leads to bigger body size and less lean mass in the elderly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-410
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume85
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

Fingerprint

Cohort Effect
Body Composition
body composition
Parturition
Adipose Tissue
Fats
body fat
sampling
Photon Absorptiometry
Body Size
lipids
Obesity
Bone and Bones
Health
X-radiation
obesity
body size
bones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Ding, J., Kritchevsky, S. B., Newman, A. B., Taaffe, D. R., Nicklas, B. J., Visser, M., ... Harris, T. B. (2007). Effects of birth cohort and age on body composition in a sample of community-based elderly. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 85(2), 405-410.

Effects of birth cohort and age on body composition in a sample of community-based elderly. / Ding, Jingzhong; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Newman, Anne B.; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Visser, Marjolein; Jung, Sun Lee; Nevitt, Michael; Tylavsky, Frances; Rubin, Susan M.; Pahor, Marco; Harris, Tamara B.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 85, No. 2, 01.02.2007, p. 405-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ding, J, Kritchevsky, SB, Newman, AB, Taaffe, DR, Nicklas, BJ, Visser, M, Jung, SL, Nevitt, M, Tylavsky, F, Rubin, SM, Pahor, M & Harris, TB 2007, 'Effects of birth cohort and age on body composition in a sample of community-based elderly', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 85, no. 2, pp. 405-410.
Ding J, Kritchevsky SB, Newman AB, Taaffe DR, Nicklas BJ, Visser M et al. Effects of birth cohort and age on body composition in a sample of community-based elderly. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2007 Feb 1;85(2):405-410.
Ding, Jingzhong ; Kritchevsky, Stephen B. ; Newman, Anne B. ; Taaffe, Dennis R. ; Nicklas, Barbara J. ; Visser, Marjolein ; Jung, Sun Lee ; Nevitt, Michael ; Tylavsky, Frances ; Rubin, Susan M. ; Pahor, Marco ; Harris, Tamara B. / Effects of birth cohort and age on body composition in a sample of community-based elderly. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 85, No. 2. pp. 405-410.
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