Effects of chronic phenylpropanolamine infusion and termination on body weight, food consumption and water consumption in rats

Suzan E. Winders, John C. Amos, Mary R. Wilson, Paul A. Rushing, Thane Dykstra, Mathilda Coday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study determined the effect of chronic PPA infusion and withdrawal on weight regulation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received PPA (0, 90 or 180 mg/kg) via miniosmotic pumps for 2 weeks. Body weight and food and water consumption were measured daily before, during, and for 2 weeks after PPA infusion. Additionally, body weight was measured once 6 weeks after the last day of drug administration. PPA infusion produced dose-dependent reductions in body weight and food consumption throughout drug administration. During the first week of PPA termination, food consumption returned to control levels; however, body weights of drug-treated animals remained below those of controls throughout the 6-week post-drug period. PPA depressed water intake during the first week of drug administration, but tolerance to this effect developed by the second week of administration. These results suggest chronic PPA infusion produces persistent appetite suppression and weight loss and that discontinuation of PPA does not result in hyperphagia or rapid weight gain. These findings may have clinical significance for the many individuals who wish to lose weight but have difficulty reducing intake without pharmacologic assistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-519
Number of pages7
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1994

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Phenylpropanolamine
Drinking
Body Weight
Food
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Tolerance
Weights and Measures
Hyperphagia
Body Water
Appetite
Weight Gain
Sprague Dawley Rats
Weight Loss

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Effects of chronic phenylpropanolamine infusion and termination on body weight, food consumption and water consumption in rats. / Winders, Suzan E.; Amos, John C.; Wilson, Mary R.; Rushing, Paul A.; Dykstra, Thane; Coday, Mathilda.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 114, No. 3, 01.04.1994, p. 513-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winders, Suzan E. ; Amos, John C. ; Wilson, Mary R. ; Rushing, Paul A. ; Dykstra, Thane ; Coday, Mathilda. / Effects of chronic phenylpropanolamine infusion and termination on body weight, food consumption and water consumption in rats. In: Psychopharmacology. 1994 ; Vol. 114, No. 3. pp. 513-519.
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