Effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on sleep-wake behavior, anxiety-like behavior and contextual memory in rats

Max P. Huang, Kushan Radadia, Brian W. Macone, Sanford H. Auerbach, Subimal Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At present, eszopiclone and zolpidem are the most commonly prescribed drugs for treating insomnia. Despite the established relationship between sleep disturbance and anxiety, it remains unknown whether targeted treatment for insomnia may affect acute anxiety. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of three different doses (1, 3, and 10. mg/kg) of eszopiclone and zolpidem on the states of sleep and wakefulness, levels of anxiety-like behavior, and long-term contextual memory in footshock-induced anxious rats. The results of this study demonstrated that the administration of eszopiclone and zolpidem both were equally effective in attenuating footshock stressor-induced suppression of slow-wave sleep (SWS). The administration of eszopiclone at 1. mg/kg or zolpidem at 1 and 3. mg/kg doses showed a tendency for attenuating stressor-induced suppression of REM sleep. However, the REM sleep attenuating effects of these drugs disappeared when they were administered at higher doses. The administration of eszopiclone at 3 and 10. mg/kg doses and zolpidem at all three doses reduced the power of electroencephalographic theta band frequencies during wakefulness. In addition, the administration of eszopiclone at 1 and 3. mg/kg doses suppressed stressor-induced anxiety-like behavior. The administration of zolpidem at 1, 3, or 10. mg/kg doses was not effective in attenuating stressor-induced anxiety-like behavior. Contextual memory after administration of eszopiclone at 1. mg/kg dose had no effects, but was reduced significantly with increased dosage. Contextual memory after administration of zolpidem, at all three doses, was severely disrupted. The results of this study suggest that eszopiclone at a low dose could be used effectively to control anxiety and anxiety-induced insomnia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-66
Number of pages13
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume210
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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Sleep
Anxiety
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Wakefulness
REM Sleep
Long-Term Memory
zolpidem
Eszopiclone
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on sleep-wake behavior, anxiety-like behavior and contextual memory in rats. / Huang, Max P.; Radadia, Kushan; Macone, Brian W.; Auerbach, Sanford H.; Datta, Subimal.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 210, No. 1, 01.06.2010, p. 54-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, Max P. ; Radadia, Kushan ; Macone, Brian W. ; Auerbach, Sanford H. ; Datta, Subimal. / Effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on sleep-wake behavior, anxiety-like behavior and contextual memory in rats. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2010 ; Vol. 210, No. 1. pp. 54-66.
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