Effects of experimental myocardial infarction on the ST segment response to tachycardia

David M. Mirvis, Jack L. Wilson, K Ramanathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prior studies have shown that tachycardia results in ST segment depression in dogs with chronic, gradual coronary occlusion. This response was compared with that produced by acute, total occlusion of the left anterior descending artery. Ten dogs served as controls; in another 10 dogs, an ameroid constrictor was implanted about the left anterior descending artery. This artery was acutely ligated in a third set of 10 animals, and in a final set of 10, the distal left anterior descending coronary vasculature was embolized by latex injection. Tachycardia was produced by atrial pacing from rates of 90 to 250 beats/min using implanted atrial electrodes. Electrocardiographic signals registered from 84 torso electrodes were used to construct body surface isopotential maps during the ST segment. In normal dogs, pacing increased repolarization potentials without shifts in spatial features. New and abnormal anterior negativity, correlating with significant ST depression, appeared at rates of 170 beats/min or faster in dogs with ameroid constriction. However, in both groups with acute occlusion that produced transmural myocardial infarction, tachycardia resulted in increases in anterior ST elevation and reciprocal ST depression. Specific findings demonstrated the lead dependency of the response to tachycardia and the greater than normal increase in potential magnitudes after infarction than in control cases. The similarity of the response with acute occlusion and with embolization suggested that the response to tachycardia after infarction was not dependent on coronary collateral function but may represent a direct electrophysiologic effect of rate. Thus, these acute occlusion models simulate exerciseinduced ST segment elevation as it may be seen clinically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-673
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

Fingerprint

Tachycardia
Myocardial Infarction
Dogs
Arteries
Infarction
Torso
Implanted Electrodes
Coronary Occlusion
Latex
Constriction
Electrodes
Injections
ameroid

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of experimental myocardial infarction on the ST segment response to tachycardia. / Mirvis, David M.; Wilson, Jack L.; Ramanathan, K.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.1985, p. 665-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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