Effects of gender and body adiposity on physiological responses to physical work while wearing body armor

Richard Ricciardi, Patricia A. Deuster, Laura Talbot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of gender and body adiposity on physiological responses to the stress of wearing body armor. Using a within-subject, repeated-measures design, 37 military personnel volunteered to undergo two experimental conditions, with body armor and without body armor. Female and male subjects with body armor, compared to those without body armor, had no significant differences in percentage increases in aerobic capacity, heart rate, or respiratory rate while walking at slow or moderate pace. However, women, as compared to men, had a significantly increased difference in the rating of perceived physical exertion between wearing and not wearing body armor at a slow pace. Fourteen subjects were not able to complete treadmill testing while wearing body armor because of volitional fatigue and/or limiting dyspnea. Body fat was the best single predictor of treadmill test completion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-748
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume172
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Physical Exertion
Physiological Stress
Military Personnel
Adiposity
Respiratory Rate
Exercise Test
Dyspnea
Walking
Fatigue
Adipose Tissue
Heart Rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of gender and body adiposity on physiological responses to physical work while wearing body armor. / Ricciardi, Richard; Deuster, Patricia A.; Talbot, Laura.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 172, No. 7, 01.01.2007, p. 743-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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