Effects of human aging on patterns of local cerebral glucose utilization determined by the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method

D. E. Kuhl, E. Metter, W. H. Riege, M. E. Phelps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

217 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FGD) scan method with positron emission computed tomography was used to determine patterns of local cerebral glucose utilization (LCMR(glu)) in 40 normal volunteer subjects aged 18 to 78 years. Throughout all the studies, each subject was quiet, without movement, with eyes open and ears unplugged, exposed only to ambient room light and sound. For the entire group, whole brain mean CMR(glu) was 26.1 ± 6.1 μmol 100 g -1 min-1 (mean ± SD, n =40). At age 78, mean CMR(glu) was, on the average, 26% less than at age 18, an alteration of the same order as the variance among subjects at any age. The gradual decline of mean CMR(glu) with advancing age occurred at a faster rate than was reported for mean cerebral oxygen utilization, possibly due to increasingly altered pathways for glucose utilization, or to increasing oxidation of ketone bodies or other alternative substrates. Glucose utilization in the hemispheres was symmetrical and mean CMR(glu) of overall cortex, caudate, and thalamus was equal in individuals at all ages. The slopes of decline with age were similar when LCMR(glu) was averaged over zones corresponding to centrum semiovale, caudate, putamen, and frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, and primary visual cortex. However, the metabolic ratio of superior frontal cortex to superior parietal cortex declined with age, possibly due to selective degeneration of superior frontal cortex or to differences between age groups in the sensory and cognitive response to the study. These results should be useful in distinguishing age from disease effects when the FDG scan method is used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-171
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

Fingerprint

Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Glucose
Frontal Lobe
Emission-Computed Tomography
Ketone Bodies
Parietal Lobe
Putamen
Visual Cortex
Eye Movements
Thalamus
Positron-Emission Tomography
Ear
Healthy Volunteers
Age Groups
Oxygen
Light
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of human aging on patterns of local cerebral glucose utilization determined by the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method. / Kuhl, D. E.; Metter, E.; Riege, W. H.; Phelps, M. E.

In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.01.1982, p. 163-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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