Effects of inertial load and countermeasures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow

Myron A. Chornuk, Susan L. Bernard, John W. Burns, Robb W. Glenny, Don D. Sheriff, Scott Sinclair, Nayak L. Polissar, Michael P. Hlastala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assessed the influence of cranial-to-caudal inertial force (+G(z)) and the countermeasures of anti-G suit and positive pressure breathing during G (PBG), specifically during +G(z), on regional pulmonary blood flow distribution. Unanesthetized swine were exposed randomly to 0 G(z) (resting), +3 G(z), +6 G(z), and +9 G(z), with and without anti-G suit and PBG with the use of the Air Force Research Laboratory centrifuge at Brooks Air Force Base (the gravitational force of the Earth, that is, the dorsal-to-ventral inertial force, was present for all runs). Fluorescent microspheres were injected into the pulmonary vasculature as a marker of regional pulmonary blood flow. Lungs were excised, dried, and diced into ~2-cm3 pieces, and the fluorescence of each piece was measured. As +G(z) was increased from 0 to +3 G(z), blood flow shifted from cranial and hilar regions toward caudal and peripheral regions of the lung. This redistribution shifted back toward cranial and hilar regions as anti-G suit inflation pressure increased at +6 and +9 G(z). Perfusion heterogeneity increased with + G(z) stress and decreased at the higher anti-G suit pressures. The distribution of pulmonary blood flow was not affected by PBG. ANOVA indicated anatomic structure as the major determinant of pulmonary blood flow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-457
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume89
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 31 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gravity Suits
Lung
Respiration
Regional Blood Flow
Air
Economic Inflation
Gravitation
Microspheres
Analysis of Variance
Swine
Perfusion
Fluorescence
Pressure
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Chornuk, M. A., Bernard, S. L., Burns, J. W., Glenny, R. W., Sheriff, D. D., Sinclair, S., ... Hlastala, M. P. (2000). Effects of inertial load and countermeasures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. Journal of Applied Physiology, 89(2), 445-457.

Effects of inertial load and countermeasures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. / Chornuk, Myron A.; Bernard, Susan L.; Burns, John W.; Glenny, Robb W.; Sheriff, Don D.; Sinclair, Scott; Polissar, Nayak L.; Hlastala, Michael P.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 89, No. 2, 31.08.2000, p. 445-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chornuk, MA, Bernard, SL, Burns, JW, Glenny, RW, Sheriff, DD, Sinclair, S, Polissar, NL & Hlastala, MP 2000, 'Effects of inertial load and countermeasures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 89, no. 2, pp. 445-457.
Chornuk MA, Bernard SL, Burns JW, Glenny RW, Sheriff DD, Sinclair S et al. Effects of inertial load and countermeasures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2000 Aug 31;89(2):445-457.
Chornuk, Myron A. ; Bernard, Susan L. ; Burns, John W. ; Glenny, Robb W. ; Sheriff, Don D. ; Sinclair, Scott ; Polissar, Nayak L. ; Hlastala, Michael P. / Effects of inertial load and countermeasures on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2000 ; Vol. 89, No. 2. pp. 445-457.
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