Effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, on interleukin-2-induced capillary leakage and antitumor responses in healthy and tumor-bearing mice

Amila Orucevic, P. K. Lala

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Abstract

We tested whether treatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (NG-methyl-L-arginine, MeArg) can ameliorate interleukin-2(IL-2)-therapy-induced capillary leak syndrome in healthy or tumor-bearing mice without compromising the antitumor effects of IL-2 therapy. Healthy or C3-L5-mammary-adenocarcinoma-bearing C3H/HeJ mice were treated with one or two rounds of various doses of IL-2 (ten injections, i. p., every 8 h) or MeArg (ten injections s. c., every 8 h) or their combination. In an additional experiment, MeArg was given chronically in the drinking water, rather than s. c. to healthy mice subjected to one round of therapy as above. Mice were killed 1 h after their last IL-2 injection to measure the water content of the lungs and pleural cavities (markers of capillary leakage), NO production (given by NO2- and NO3- levels in the serum and pleural effusion), as well as the effect of therapies on the primary tumor size and number of spontaneous lung metastatic nodules. Results revealed that all doses of IL-2 (7500-35000 Cetus U/ injection), as well as both rounds of IL-2 therapy, caused capillary leakage. However, no pleural effusion was seen after the second round in any of the IL-2-treated groups. MeArg therapy, given subcutaneously (5-20 mg kg-1 injection-1 in healthy and 20 mgkg-1 injection-1 in tumor-bearing mice), did not ameliorate IL-2-induced capillary leakage in either group of mice, and did not compromise antitumor effects of IL-2. However, subcutaneous MeArg therapy alone reduced the growth of the primary tumors, the occurrence of spontaneous lung metastases and the amount of tumor-induced pulmonary edema. When MeArg therapy was given orally (1 mg/ml drinking water), a substantial drop in NO production, as well as reduction in capillary leakage was noted in IL-2-treated healthy mice. These findings suggest that NO inhibitors could be a valuable adjunct to IL-2 therapy of cancer and infectious diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-46
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Immunology, Immunotherapy
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Interleukin-2
Arginine
Nitric Oxide
Neoplasms
Injections
Therapeutics
Pleural Effusion
Drinking Water
Lung
Capillary Leak Syndrome
Pleural Cavity
Inbred C3H Mouse
Pulmonary Edema
Communicable Diseases
Adenocarcinoma
Breast
Neoplasm Metastasis
Water
Growth
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "Effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, on interleukin-2-induced capillary leakage and antitumor responses in healthy and tumor-bearing mice",
abstract = "We tested whether treatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (NG-methyl-L-arginine, MeArg) can ameliorate interleukin-2(IL-2)-therapy-induced capillary leak syndrome in healthy or tumor-bearing mice without compromising the antitumor effects of IL-2 therapy. Healthy or C3-L5-mammary-adenocarcinoma-bearing C3H/HeJ mice were treated with one or two rounds of various doses of IL-2 (ten injections, i. p., every 8 h) or MeArg (ten injections s. c., every 8 h) or their combination. In an additional experiment, MeArg was given chronically in the drinking water, rather than s. c. to healthy mice subjected to one round of therapy as above. Mice were killed 1 h after their last IL-2 injection to measure the water content of the lungs and pleural cavities (markers of capillary leakage), NO production (given by NO2- and NO3- levels in the serum and pleural effusion), as well as the effect of therapies on the primary tumor size and number of spontaneous lung metastatic nodules. Results revealed that all doses of IL-2 (7500-35000 Cetus U/ injection), as well as both rounds of IL-2 therapy, caused capillary leakage. However, no pleural effusion was seen after the second round in any of the IL-2-treated groups. MeArg therapy, given subcutaneously (5-20 mg kg-1 injection-1 in healthy and 20 mgkg-1 injection-1 in tumor-bearing mice), did not ameliorate IL-2-induced capillary leakage in either group of mice, and did not compromise antitumor effects of IL-2. However, subcutaneous MeArg therapy alone reduced the growth of the primary tumors, the occurrence of spontaneous lung metastases and the amount of tumor-induced pulmonary edema. When MeArg therapy was given orally (1 mg/ml drinking water), a substantial drop in NO production, as well as reduction in capillary leakage was noted in IL-2-treated healthy mice. These findings suggest that NO inhibitors could be a valuable adjunct to IL-2 therapy of cancer and infectious diseases.",
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N2 - We tested whether treatment with an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis (NG-methyl-L-arginine, MeArg) can ameliorate interleukin-2(IL-2)-therapy-induced capillary leak syndrome in healthy or tumor-bearing mice without compromising the antitumor effects of IL-2 therapy. Healthy or C3-L5-mammary-adenocarcinoma-bearing C3H/HeJ mice were treated with one or two rounds of various doses of IL-2 (ten injections, i. p., every 8 h) or MeArg (ten injections s. c., every 8 h) or their combination. In an additional experiment, MeArg was given chronically in the drinking water, rather than s. c. to healthy mice subjected to one round of therapy as above. Mice were killed 1 h after their last IL-2 injection to measure the water content of the lungs and pleural cavities (markers of capillary leakage), NO production (given by NO2- and NO3- levels in the serum and pleural effusion), as well as the effect of therapies on the primary tumor size and number of spontaneous lung metastatic nodules. Results revealed that all doses of IL-2 (7500-35000 Cetus U/ injection), as well as both rounds of IL-2 therapy, caused capillary leakage. However, no pleural effusion was seen after the second round in any of the IL-2-treated groups. MeArg therapy, given subcutaneously (5-20 mg kg-1 injection-1 in healthy and 20 mgkg-1 injection-1 in tumor-bearing mice), did not ameliorate IL-2-induced capillary leakage in either group of mice, and did not compromise antitumor effects of IL-2. However, subcutaneous MeArg therapy alone reduced the growth of the primary tumors, the occurrence of spontaneous lung metastases and the amount of tumor-induced pulmonary edema. When MeArg therapy was given orally (1 mg/ml drinking water), a substantial drop in NO production, as well as reduction in capillary leakage was noted in IL-2-treated healthy mice. These findings suggest that NO inhibitors could be a valuable adjunct to IL-2 therapy of cancer and infectious diseases.

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