Effects of physical activity counseling in primary care

The activity counseling trial: A randomized controlled trial

The Writing Group for the Activity Counseling Trial Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

265 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Physical activity is important for health, yet few studies have examined the effectiveness of physical activity patient counseling in primary care. Objective: To compare the effects of 2 physical activity counseling interventions with current recommended care and with each other in a primary care setting. Design: The Activity Counseling Trial, a randomized controlled trial with recruitment in 1995-1997, with 24 months of follow-up. Setting: Eleven primary care facilities affiliated with 3 US clinical research centers. Participants: Volunteer sample of 395 female and 479 male inactive primary care patients aged 35 to 75 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: advice (n=292), which included physician advice and written educational materials (recommended care); assistance (n=293), which included all the components received by the advice group plus interactive mail and behavioral counseling at physician visits; or counseling (n=289), which included the assistance and advice group components plus regular telephone counseling and behavioral classes. Main Outcome Measures: Cardiorespiratory fitness, measured by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and self-reported total physical activity, measured by a 7-day Physical Activity Recall, compared among the 3 groups and analyzed separately for men and women at 24 months. Results: At 24 months, 91.4% of the sample had completed physical activity and 77.6% had completed cardiorespiratory fitness measurements. For women at 24 months, VO2max was significantly higher in the assistance group than in the advice group (mean difference, 80.7 mL/min; 99.2% confidence interval [Cl], 8.1-153.2 mL/min) and in the counseling group than in the advice group (mean difference, 73.9 mL/min; 99.2% Cl, 0.9-147.0 mL/min), with no difference between the counseling and assistance groups and no significant differences in reported total physical activity. For men, there were no significant between-group differences in cardiorespiratory fitness or total physical activity. Conclusions: Two patient counseling interventions differing in type and number of contacts were equally effective in women in improving cardiorespiratory fitness over 2 years compared with recommended care. In men, neither of the 2 counseling interventions was more effective than recommended care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-687
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume286
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2001

Fingerprint

Counseling
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Physicians
Postal Service
Telephone
Volunteers
Cardiovascular Diseases
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Oxygen
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of physical activity counseling in primary care : The activity counseling trial: A randomized controlled trial. / The Writing Group for the Activity Counseling Trial Research Group.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 286, No. 6, 08.08.2001, p. 677-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The Writing Group for the Activity Counseling Trial Research Group. / Effects of physical activity counseling in primary care : The activity counseling trial: A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 2001 ; Vol. 286, No. 6. pp. 677-687.
@article{643e8d47f49c4e21ab77db557beb010b,
title = "Effects of physical activity counseling in primary care: The activity counseling trial: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Context: Physical activity is important for health, yet few studies have examined the effectiveness of physical activity patient counseling in primary care. Objective: To compare the effects of 2 physical activity counseling interventions with current recommended care and with each other in a primary care setting. Design: The Activity Counseling Trial, a randomized controlled trial with recruitment in 1995-1997, with 24 months of follow-up. Setting: Eleven primary care facilities affiliated with 3 US clinical research centers. Participants: Volunteer sample of 395 female and 479 male inactive primary care patients aged 35 to 75 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: advice (n=292), which included physician advice and written educational materials (recommended care); assistance (n=293), which included all the components received by the advice group plus interactive mail and behavioral counseling at physician visits; or counseling (n=289), which included the assistance and advice group components plus regular telephone counseling and behavioral classes. Main Outcome Measures: Cardiorespiratory fitness, measured by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and self-reported total physical activity, measured by a 7-day Physical Activity Recall, compared among the 3 groups and analyzed separately for men and women at 24 months. Results: At 24 months, 91.4{\%} of the sample had completed physical activity and 77.6{\%} had completed cardiorespiratory fitness measurements. For women at 24 months, VO2max was significantly higher in the assistance group than in the advice group (mean difference, 80.7 mL/min; 99.2{\%} confidence interval [Cl], 8.1-153.2 mL/min) and in the counseling group than in the advice group (mean difference, 73.9 mL/min; 99.2{\%} Cl, 0.9-147.0 mL/min), with no difference between the counseling and assistance groups and no significant differences in reported total physical activity. For men, there were no significant between-group differences in cardiorespiratory fitness or total physical activity. Conclusions: Two patient counseling interventions differing in type and number of contacts were equally effective in women in improving cardiorespiratory fitness over 2 years compared with recommended care. In men, neither of the 2 counseling interventions was more effective than recommended care.",
author = "{The Writing Group for the Activity Counseling Trial Research Group} and Steven Blair and Andrea Dunn and Larry Gibbons and Benjamin Levine and Peter Snell and James Sallis and Bess Marcus and Melissa Garcia and Amy Strasner and Sheila Reynolds and Michelle Edwards and Nancy Pierce and Ruth Carpenter and Laura Fast and Christopher Cole and Jerome Differding and James Kampert and Alan Levitt and Jay Revi and Joe Simpson and Kelly Wilks and Henry Armstrong and Leonard Berry and Durado Brooks and Laura Defina and Melanie Green and Tom Hampton and Edith Hawkins and Kathleen McAllister and Bristol Ming and Mark Nelson and Jack Shelton and Paul Sokal and Peter Stack and Kathy Zeller and Abby King and William Haskell and Cheryl Albright and Leslie Pruitt and Lisa Palmer and Wayne Phillips and Ami Laws and Karen Bolen and Marcia Stefanick and Irene Etter-McNee and Kelley Callahan and Marina Nicolae and Karen Johnson and Mathilda Coday and James Bailey",
year = "2001",
month = "8",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1001/jama.286.6.677",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "286",
pages = "677--687",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0002-9955",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of physical activity counseling in primary care

T2 - The activity counseling trial: A randomized controlled trial

AU - The Writing Group for the Activity Counseling Trial Research Group

AU - Blair, Steven

AU - Dunn, Andrea

AU - Gibbons, Larry

AU - Levine, Benjamin

AU - Snell, Peter

AU - Sallis, James

AU - Marcus, Bess

AU - Garcia, Melissa

AU - Strasner, Amy

AU - Reynolds, Sheila

AU - Edwards, Michelle

AU - Pierce, Nancy

AU - Carpenter, Ruth

AU - Fast, Laura

AU - Cole, Christopher

AU - Differding, Jerome

AU - Kampert, James

AU - Levitt, Alan

AU - Revi, Jay

AU - Simpson, Joe

AU - Wilks, Kelly

AU - Armstrong, Henry

AU - Berry, Leonard

AU - Brooks, Durado

AU - Defina, Laura

AU - Green, Melanie

AU - Hampton, Tom

AU - Hawkins, Edith

AU - McAllister, Kathleen

AU - Ming, Bristol

AU - Nelson, Mark

AU - Shelton, Jack

AU - Sokal, Paul

AU - Stack, Peter

AU - Zeller, Kathy

AU - King, Abby

AU - Haskell, William

AU - Albright, Cheryl

AU - Pruitt, Leslie

AU - Palmer, Lisa

AU - Phillips, Wayne

AU - Laws, Ami

AU - Bolen, Karen

AU - Stefanick, Marcia

AU - Etter-McNee, Irene

AU - Callahan, Kelley

AU - Nicolae, Marina

AU - Johnson, Karen

AU - Coday, Mathilda

AU - Bailey, James

PY - 2001/8/8

Y1 - 2001/8/8

N2 - Context: Physical activity is important for health, yet few studies have examined the effectiveness of physical activity patient counseling in primary care. Objective: To compare the effects of 2 physical activity counseling interventions with current recommended care and with each other in a primary care setting. Design: The Activity Counseling Trial, a randomized controlled trial with recruitment in 1995-1997, with 24 months of follow-up. Setting: Eleven primary care facilities affiliated with 3 US clinical research centers. Participants: Volunteer sample of 395 female and 479 male inactive primary care patients aged 35 to 75 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: advice (n=292), which included physician advice and written educational materials (recommended care); assistance (n=293), which included all the components received by the advice group plus interactive mail and behavioral counseling at physician visits; or counseling (n=289), which included the assistance and advice group components plus regular telephone counseling and behavioral classes. Main Outcome Measures: Cardiorespiratory fitness, measured by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and self-reported total physical activity, measured by a 7-day Physical Activity Recall, compared among the 3 groups and analyzed separately for men and women at 24 months. Results: At 24 months, 91.4% of the sample had completed physical activity and 77.6% had completed cardiorespiratory fitness measurements. For women at 24 months, VO2max was significantly higher in the assistance group than in the advice group (mean difference, 80.7 mL/min; 99.2% confidence interval [Cl], 8.1-153.2 mL/min) and in the counseling group than in the advice group (mean difference, 73.9 mL/min; 99.2% Cl, 0.9-147.0 mL/min), with no difference between the counseling and assistance groups and no significant differences in reported total physical activity. For men, there were no significant between-group differences in cardiorespiratory fitness or total physical activity. Conclusions: Two patient counseling interventions differing in type and number of contacts were equally effective in women in improving cardiorespiratory fitness over 2 years compared with recommended care. In men, neither of the 2 counseling interventions was more effective than recommended care.

AB - Context: Physical activity is important for health, yet few studies have examined the effectiveness of physical activity patient counseling in primary care. Objective: To compare the effects of 2 physical activity counseling interventions with current recommended care and with each other in a primary care setting. Design: The Activity Counseling Trial, a randomized controlled trial with recruitment in 1995-1997, with 24 months of follow-up. Setting: Eleven primary care facilities affiliated with 3 US clinical research centers. Participants: Volunteer sample of 395 female and 479 male inactive primary care patients aged 35 to 75 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: advice (n=292), which included physician advice and written educational materials (recommended care); assistance (n=293), which included all the components received by the advice group plus interactive mail and behavioral counseling at physician visits; or counseling (n=289), which included the assistance and advice group components plus regular telephone counseling and behavioral classes. Main Outcome Measures: Cardiorespiratory fitness, measured by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and self-reported total physical activity, measured by a 7-day Physical Activity Recall, compared among the 3 groups and analyzed separately for men and women at 24 months. Results: At 24 months, 91.4% of the sample had completed physical activity and 77.6% had completed cardiorespiratory fitness measurements. For women at 24 months, VO2max was significantly higher in the assistance group than in the advice group (mean difference, 80.7 mL/min; 99.2% confidence interval [Cl], 8.1-153.2 mL/min) and in the counseling group than in the advice group (mean difference, 73.9 mL/min; 99.2% Cl, 0.9-147.0 mL/min), with no difference between the counseling and assistance groups and no significant differences in reported total physical activity. For men, there were no significant between-group differences in cardiorespiratory fitness or total physical activity. Conclusions: Two patient counseling interventions differing in type and number of contacts were equally effective in women in improving cardiorespiratory fitness over 2 years compared with recommended care. In men, neither of the 2 counseling interventions was more effective than recommended care.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035827864&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035827864&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jama.286.6.677

DO - 10.1001/jama.286.6.677

M3 - Article

VL - 286

SP - 677

EP - 687

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0002-9955

IS - 6

ER -