Effects of processed cheese on human plaque pH and demineralization and remineralization.

Mark Jensen, J. S. Wefel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This two-part study was undertaken to examine the effects of processed cheese on human plaque pH and de- and remineralization of enamel and root lesions in a human in situ caries model system. In the first part of the study the selected processed cheese (Kraft American Singles Processed Cheese Food) was eaten alone and followed by a 10% sucrose rinse after the acidogenicity of the plaque was demonstrated. A 10% sucrose rinse alone resulted in a mean minimum pH of 4.26. The cheese alone showed a mean minimum pF of 6.32 and cheese followed by sucrose resulted in a mean minimum pH of 6.48. The plaque pH of cheese eaten alone stayed at pH above 5.7 (the "safe for teeth" level). Cheese consumption also prevented the acid challenge when followed by sucrose. The second part of the study utilized the thin-sections of artificially created caries-like lesions on enamel and root, and sound root sections. One-month periods were used in a cross-over design to examine the effect of eating the cheese q.i.d. Polarized light microscopy was used to determine changes in the size of lesion areas. The addition of the processed cheese to the diet resulted in statistically significant reductions in enamel lesion size as well as a reduction in progression of root lesions. Lesions created on the sound root surfaces were approximately one-third the size of those created during the control period. This study indicates that processed cheese is hypoacidogenic, anti-acidogenic, and prevents demineralization as well as enhances remineralization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of dentistry
Volume3
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1 1990

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Cheese
Sucrose
Dental Enamel
Polarization Microscopy
Cross-Over Studies
Tooth
Eating
Diet
Food
Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Effects of processed cheese on human plaque pH and demineralization and remineralization. / Jensen, Mark; Wefel, J. S.

In: American journal of dentistry, Vol. 3, No. 5, 01.10.1990, p. 217-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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