Effects of resistance and Tai Ji training on mobility and symptoms in knee osteoarthritis patients

Michael Wortley, Songning Zhang, Maxime Paquette, Erin Byrd, Lucas Baumgartner, Gary Klipple, John Krusenklaus, Larry Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: No studies have compared effectiveness of resistance training and Tai Ji exercise on relieving symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of the study was to evaluate effects of a 10-week Tai Ji and resistance training intervention on improving OA symptoms and mobility in seniors with knee OA. Methods: Thirty-one seniors (60-85 years) were randomly assigned to a Tai Ji program (n=12), a resistance training program (n=13), and a control group (n=6). All participants completed the Western Ontario and MacMaster (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index and performed three physical performance tests (6-min walk, timed-up-and-go, and timed stair climb and descent) before and after the 10-week intervention. Results: The participants in the resistance training group significantly improved on the timed-up-and-go test (p=0.001), the WOMAC pain sub-score (p=0.006), WOMAC stiffness sub-score (p<0.001), and WOMAC physical function sub-score (p=0.011). The Tai Ji group significantly improved on the timed-up-and-go test (p<0.001), but not on the WOMAC scores. Conclusion: Resistance training was effective for improving mobility and improving the symptoms of knee OA. Tai Ji was also effective for improving mobility, but did not improve knee OA symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-214
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sport and Health Science
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Tai Ji
Resistance Training
Knee Osteoarthritis
Ontario
Osteoarthritis
Exercise
Education
Pain
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effects of resistance and Tai Ji training on mobility and symptoms in knee osteoarthritis patients. / Wortley, Michael; Zhang, Songning; Paquette, Maxime; Byrd, Erin; Baumgartner, Lucas; Klipple, Gary; Krusenklaus, John; Brown, Larry.

In: Journal of Sport and Health Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.01.2013, p. 209-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wortley, M, Zhang, S, Paquette, M, Byrd, E, Baumgartner, L, Klipple, G, Krusenklaus, J & Brown, L 2013, 'Effects of resistance and Tai Ji training on mobility and symptoms in knee osteoarthritis patients', Journal of Sport and Health Science, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 209-214. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jshs.2013.01.001
Wortley, Michael ; Zhang, Songning ; Paquette, Maxime ; Byrd, Erin ; Baumgartner, Lucas ; Klipple, Gary ; Krusenklaus, John ; Brown, Larry. / Effects of resistance and Tai Ji training on mobility and symptoms in knee osteoarthritis patients. In: Journal of Sport and Health Science. 2013 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 209-214.
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