Effects of reversible inactivation of the supplementary motor area (SMA) on unimanual grasp and bimanual pull and grasp performance in monkeys

I. Kermadi, Yu Liu, A. Tempini, E. M. Rouiller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The supplementary motor area (SMA) was reversibly inactivated by muscimol microinfusion in two monkeys while they were performing two motor tasks: (1) a delayed conditional bimanual drawer pulling and grasping sequence which was initiated on a self-paced basis; (2) a unimanual reach and grasp task (modified Kluver board task). Unilateral or bilateral inactivation of the SMA induced a prominent deficit in trial initiation of bimanual sequential movements, affecting the hand contralateral to the inactivated side or both hands, respectively. The deficit was a long lasting (10-15 min or more) inability of the monkey to place its hand (s) in the ready position on start touch-sensitive pads, a condition required to initiate the drawer task. However, if after such a deficit period, the experimenter put his hand on the start touch-sensitive pad to initiate the trial, then the monkey executed the drawer task without obvious motor deficit. SMA inactivation did not affect unimanual reaching and grasping movements in the board task. In contrast to the SMA, inactivation of other motor areas (primary, premotor dorsal, anterior intraparietal area) did not affect the initiation of movement sequences in the drawer task. These data thus indicate that the SMA plays a crucial and specific role in initiation of self-paced movement sequences. However, SMA inactivation did not prevent the monkeys to perform coordinated movements of the two forelimbs and hands, indicating that SMA is not necessary for bimanual coordination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-280
Number of pages13
JournalSomatosensory and Motor Research
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997

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Motor Cortex
Hand Strength
Haplorhini
Hand
Touch
Muscimol
Forelimb

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of reversible inactivation of the supplementary motor area (SMA) on unimanual grasp and bimanual pull and grasp performance in monkeys. / Kermadi, I.; Liu, Yu; Tempini, A.; Rouiller, E. M.

In: Somatosensory and Motor Research, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.12.1997, p. 268-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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