Effects of saline instillation during tracheal suction on lung mechanics in newborn infants.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To evaluate the effect of saline instillation prior to tracheal suction on lung mechanics in mechanically ventilated newborn infants, we studied pulmonary mechanics in nine infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and nine infants with meconium-aspiration syndrome (MAS) at a mean postnatal age of 3 days. Pulmonary mechanics were measured at 10 minutes prior to, and at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after tracheal suction with saline instillation. Suction and study protocol were repeated within 12 hours without saline instillation. The sequence of the study with and without saline instillation was randomly assigned. In infants with RDS, tracheal suction had no effect on pulmonary compliance or airway resistance with and without saline instillation. In infants with MAS, there was no change in compliance after tracheal suction with and without saline instillation. Airway resistance decreased by 35% after tracheal suction with saline instillation in infants with MAS; tracheal suction without saline instillation had no effect on airway resistance. We conclude that saline instillation into trachea as commonly done during tracheal suction has no deleterious effects on lung mechanics in newborn infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-123
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume12
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Suction
Mechanics
Newborn Infant
Lung
Meconium Aspiration Syndrome
Airway Resistance
Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Lung Compliance
Trachea
Compliance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Effects of saline instillation during tracheal suction on lung mechanics in newborn infants. / Beeram, M. R.; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 12, No. 2, 06.1992, p. 120-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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