Effects of sentence context on phonemic categorization of natural and synthetic consonant-vowel tokens

Mark Hedrick, Ji Young Lee, Ashley Harkrider, Deborah Von Hapsburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose was to assess if phonemic categorization in sentential context is best explained by autonomous feedforward processing or by top-down feedback processing that affects phonemic representation. 11 listeners with normal hearing, ages 20-50 years, were asked to label consonants in /pi/ - /ti/ consonant-vowel (CV) stimuli in 9-step continua. One continuum was derived from natural tokens and the other was synthetically generated. The CV stimuli were presented in isolation and in three sentential contexts: a neutral context, a context favoring /p/, and a context favoring /t/. For both natural and synthetic stimuli, the isolated and neutral context sentences yielded significantly more /t/ responses than sentence contexts primed for either /p/ or /t/. No other conditions were significantly different. Results did not show easily explainable semantic context effects. Instead, data clustering was more readily explained by top-down feedback processing affecting phonemic representation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-224
Number of pages15
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume118
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Semantics
Hearing
Cluster Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Effects of sentence context on phonemic categorization of natural and synthetic consonant-vowel tokens. / Hedrick, Mark; Lee, Ji Young; Harkrider, Ashley; Von Hapsburg, Deborah.

In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 118, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 210-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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