Effects of subchronic and chronic exposure to ambient air pollutants on infant bronchiolitis

Catherine Karr, Thomas Lumley, Astrid Schreuder, Robert Davis, Timothy Larson, Beate Ritz, Joel Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ambient air pollutant exposure has been linked to childhood respiratory disease, but infants have received little study. The authors tested the hypotheses that subchronic and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter (particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)), nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone increases risk of severe infant bronchiolitis requiring hospitalization. Study subjects were derived from linked birth-hospital-discharge records of infants born in 1995-2000 in the South Coast Air Basin of California. Cases with a hospital discharge for bronchiolitis in infancy were matched to 10 age- and gestational-age-matched controls. Exposures in the month prior to hospitalization (subchronic) and mean lifetime exposure (chronic) referenced to the case diagnosis date were assessed on the basis of data derived from the California Air Resources Board. In conditional logistic regression, only subchronic and chronic PM2.5 exposures were associated with increased risk of bronchiolitis hospitalization after adjustment for confounders (per 10-μg/m3 increase, adjusted odds ratio = 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.14) for both). Ozone was associated with reduced risk in the single-pollutant model, but this relation did not persist in multipollutant models including PM2.5. These unique US data suggest that infant bronchiolitis may be added to the list of adverse effects of PM2.5 exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-560
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume165
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Air Pollutants
Bronchiolitis
Hospitalization
Particulate Matter
Ozone
Air
Nitrogen Dioxide
Hospital Records
Carbon Monoxide
Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Parturition
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Effects of subchronic and chronic exposure to ambient air pollutants on infant bronchiolitis. / Karr, Catherine; Lumley, Thomas; Schreuder, Astrid; Davis, Robert; Larson, Timothy; Ritz, Beate; Kaufman, Joel.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 165, No. 5, 01.03.2007, p. 553-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karr, Catherine ; Lumley, Thomas ; Schreuder, Astrid ; Davis, Robert ; Larson, Timothy ; Ritz, Beate ; Kaufman, Joel. / Effects of subchronic and chronic exposure to ambient air pollutants on infant bronchiolitis. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2007 ; Vol. 165, No. 5. pp. 553-560.
@article{ccc02473a1a245ddb1a580318e72e43c,
title = "Effects of subchronic and chronic exposure to ambient air pollutants on infant bronchiolitis",
abstract = "Ambient air pollutant exposure has been linked to childhood respiratory disease, but infants have received little study. The authors tested the hypotheses that subchronic and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter (particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)), nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone increases risk of severe infant bronchiolitis requiring hospitalization. Study subjects were derived from linked birth-hospital-discharge records of infants born in 1995-2000 in the South Coast Air Basin of California. Cases with a hospital discharge for bronchiolitis in infancy were matched to 10 age- and gestational-age-matched controls. Exposures in the month prior to hospitalization (subchronic) and mean lifetime exposure (chronic) referenced to the case diagnosis date were assessed on the basis of data derived from the California Air Resources Board. In conditional logistic regression, only subchronic and chronic PM2.5 exposures were associated with increased risk of bronchiolitis hospitalization after adjustment for confounders (per 10-μg/m3 increase, adjusted odds ratio = 1.09 (95{\%} confidence interval: 1.04, 1.14) for both). Ozone was associated with reduced risk in the single-pollutant model, but this relation did not persist in multipollutant models including PM2.5. These unique US data suggest that infant bronchiolitis may be added to the list of adverse effects of PM2.5 exposure.",
author = "Catherine Karr and Thomas Lumley and Astrid Schreuder and Robert Davis and Timothy Larson and Beate Ritz and Joel Kaufman",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/aje/kwk032",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "165",
pages = "553--560",
journal = "American Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0002-9262",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of subchronic and chronic exposure to ambient air pollutants on infant bronchiolitis

AU - Karr, Catherine

AU - Lumley, Thomas

AU - Schreuder, Astrid

AU - Davis, Robert

AU - Larson, Timothy

AU - Ritz, Beate

AU - Kaufman, Joel

PY - 2007/3/1

Y1 - 2007/3/1

N2 - Ambient air pollutant exposure has been linked to childhood respiratory disease, but infants have received little study. The authors tested the hypotheses that subchronic and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter (particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)), nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone increases risk of severe infant bronchiolitis requiring hospitalization. Study subjects were derived from linked birth-hospital-discharge records of infants born in 1995-2000 in the South Coast Air Basin of California. Cases with a hospital discharge for bronchiolitis in infancy were matched to 10 age- and gestational-age-matched controls. Exposures in the month prior to hospitalization (subchronic) and mean lifetime exposure (chronic) referenced to the case diagnosis date were assessed on the basis of data derived from the California Air Resources Board. In conditional logistic regression, only subchronic and chronic PM2.5 exposures were associated with increased risk of bronchiolitis hospitalization after adjustment for confounders (per 10-μg/m3 increase, adjusted odds ratio = 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.14) for both). Ozone was associated with reduced risk in the single-pollutant model, but this relation did not persist in multipollutant models including PM2.5. These unique US data suggest that infant bronchiolitis may be added to the list of adverse effects of PM2.5 exposure.

AB - Ambient air pollutant exposure has been linked to childhood respiratory disease, but infants have received little study. The authors tested the hypotheses that subchronic and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter (particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)), nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone increases risk of severe infant bronchiolitis requiring hospitalization. Study subjects were derived from linked birth-hospital-discharge records of infants born in 1995-2000 in the South Coast Air Basin of California. Cases with a hospital discharge for bronchiolitis in infancy were matched to 10 age- and gestational-age-matched controls. Exposures in the month prior to hospitalization (subchronic) and mean lifetime exposure (chronic) referenced to the case diagnosis date were assessed on the basis of data derived from the California Air Resources Board. In conditional logistic regression, only subchronic and chronic PM2.5 exposures were associated with increased risk of bronchiolitis hospitalization after adjustment for confounders (per 10-μg/m3 increase, adjusted odds ratio = 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.14) for both). Ozone was associated with reduced risk in the single-pollutant model, but this relation did not persist in multipollutant models including PM2.5. These unique US data suggest that infant bronchiolitis may be added to the list of adverse effects of PM2.5 exposure.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33847390359&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33847390359&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/aje/kwk032

DO - 10.1093/aje/kwk032

M3 - Article

VL - 165

SP - 553

EP - 560

JO - American Journal of Epidemiology

JF - American Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0002-9262

IS - 5

ER -