Effects of trimethylsilane plasma coating on the hydrophobicity of denture base resin and adhesion of Candida albicans on resin surfaces

Tianshuang Liu, Changqi Xu, Liang Hong, Franklin Garcia-Godoy, Timothy Hottel, Jegdish Babu, Qingsong Yu

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Statement of problem Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal lesion among denture wearers. Trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coating may inhibit the growth of Candida albicans on denture surfaces. Purpose The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether TMS plasma coatings can effectively reduce C albicans adhesion on denture base acrylic resin surfaces. Material and methods Sixty denture base acrylic resin disks with smooth and rough surfaces were prepared and were either left untreated (control group) or coated with TMS monomer (experimental group) by using plasma. Contact angles were measured immediately after TMS plasma coating. The morphology of C albicans adhesion was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to characterize the elemental composition of the specimen surface. An adhesion test was performed by incubating the resin disk specimens in C albicans suspensions (1×10 7 cells/mL) at 37°C for 24 hours and further measuring the optical density of the C albicans by using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay test. One-way ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were followed by a post hoc test analysis (α=.05). Results The group with TMS coating exhibited a more hydrophobic surface than the control group. EDS analysis revealed successful TMS plasma coating. The difference in the mean contact angles between the uncoated group and the TMS-coated group was statistically significant (P<.05), 79.0 ±2.9 degrees versus 105.7 ±1.5 degrees for the smooth surface and 90.2 ±7.6 degrees versus 131.5 ±2.1 degrees for the rough surface. In SEM analysis, the C albicans biofilm was found to grow more on the surface of the denture base resin without the TMS coating than on the surfaces of the experimental group. In the adhesion test, the amount of C albicans adhering to the surface of denture base resin with the TMS coating was significantly less than that on the surfaces without TMS coating (P<.05). Conclusions TMS coating significantly reduced the adhesion of C albicans to the denture base resin and may reduce denture stomatitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-770
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume118
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Denture Bases
Candida albicans
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Denture Stomatitis
Acrylic Resins
Dentures
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Spectrum Analysis
Analysis of Variance
Control Groups
Biofilms
Candida
Suspensions
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

@article{577d97a257fd49498d5eb0cfc7b0a489,
title = "Effects of trimethylsilane plasma coating on the hydrophobicity of denture base resin and adhesion of Candida albicans on resin surfaces",
abstract = "Statement of problem Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal lesion among denture wearers. Trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coating may inhibit the growth of Candida albicans on denture surfaces. Purpose The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether TMS plasma coatings can effectively reduce C albicans adhesion on denture base acrylic resin surfaces. Material and methods Sixty denture base acrylic resin disks with smooth and rough surfaces were prepared and were either left untreated (control group) or coated with TMS monomer (experimental group) by using plasma. Contact angles were measured immediately after TMS plasma coating. The morphology of C albicans adhesion was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to characterize the elemental composition of the specimen surface. An adhesion test was performed by incubating the resin disk specimens in C albicans suspensions (1×10 7 cells/mL) at 37°C for 24 hours and further measuring the optical density of the C albicans by using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay test. One-way ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were followed by a post hoc test analysis (α=.05). Results The group with TMS coating exhibited a more hydrophobic surface than the control group. EDS analysis revealed successful TMS plasma coating. The difference in the mean contact angles between the uncoated group and the TMS-coated group was statistically significant (P<.05), 79.0 ±2.9 degrees versus 105.7 ±1.5 degrees for the smooth surface and 90.2 ±7.6 degrees versus 131.5 ±2.1 degrees for the rough surface. In SEM analysis, the C albicans biofilm was found to grow more on the surface of the denture base resin without the TMS coating than on the surfaces of the experimental group. In the adhesion test, the amount of C albicans adhering to the surface of denture base resin with the TMS coating was significantly less than that on the surfaces without TMS coating (P<.05). Conclusions TMS coating significantly reduced the adhesion of C albicans to the denture base resin and may reduce denture stomatitis.",
author = "Tianshuang Liu and Changqi Xu and Liang Hong and Franklin Garcia-Godoy and Timothy Hottel and Jegdish Babu and Qingsong Yu",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
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doi = "10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.01.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "765--770",
journal = "Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry",
issn = "0022-3913",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of trimethylsilane plasma coating on the hydrophobicity of denture base resin and adhesion of Candida albicans on resin surfaces

AU - Liu, Tianshuang

AU - Xu, Changqi

AU - Hong, Liang

AU - Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

AU - Hottel, Timothy

AU - Babu, Jegdish

AU - Yu, Qingsong

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Statement of problem Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal lesion among denture wearers. Trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coating may inhibit the growth of Candida albicans on denture surfaces. Purpose The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether TMS plasma coatings can effectively reduce C albicans adhesion on denture base acrylic resin surfaces. Material and methods Sixty denture base acrylic resin disks with smooth and rough surfaces were prepared and were either left untreated (control group) or coated with TMS monomer (experimental group) by using plasma. Contact angles were measured immediately after TMS plasma coating. The morphology of C albicans adhesion was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to characterize the elemental composition of the specimen surface. An adhesion test was performed by incubating the resin disk specimens in C albicans suspensions (1×10 7 cells/mL) at 37°C for 24 hours and further measuring the optical density of the C albicans by using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay test. One-way ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were followed by a post hoc test analysis (α=.05). Results The group with TMS coating exhibited a more hydrophobic surface than the control group. EDS analysis revealed successful TMS plasma coating. The difference in the mean contact angles between the uncoated group and the TMS-coated group was statistically significant (P<.05), 79.0 ±2.9 degrees versus 105.7 ±1.5 degrees for the smooth surface and 90.2 ±7.6 degrees versus 131.5 ±2.1 degrees for the rough surface. In SEM analysis, the C albicans biofilm was found to grow more on the surface of the denture base resin without the TMS coating than on the surfaces of the experimental group. In the adhesion test, the amount of C albicans adhering to the surface of denture base resin with the TMS coating was significantly less than that on the surfaces without TMS coating (P<.05). Conclusions TMS coating significantly reduced the adhesion of C albicans to the denture base resin and may reduce denture stomatitis.

AB - Statement of problem Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal lesion among denture wearers. Trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coating may inhibit the growth of Candida albicans on denture surfaces. Purpose The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate whether TMS plasma coatings can effectively reduce C albicans adhesion on denture base acrylic resin surfaces. Material and methods Sixty denture base acrylic resin disks with smooth and rough surfaces were prepared and were either left untreated (control group) or coated with TMS monomer (experimental group) by using plasma. Contact angles were measured immediately after TMS plasma coating. The morphology of C albicans adhesion was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to characterize the elemental composition of the specimen surface. An adhesion test was performed by incubating the resin disk specimens in C albicans suspensions (1×10 7 cells/mL) at 37°C for 24 hours and further measuring the optical density of the C albicans by using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay test. One-way ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA were followed by a post hoc test analysis (α=.05). Results The group with TMS coating exhibited a more hydrophobic surface than the control group. EDS analysis revealed successful TMS plasma coating. The difference in the mean contact angles between the uncoated group and the TMS-coated group was statistically significant (P<.05), 79.0 ±2.9 degrees versus 105.7 ±1.5 degrees for the smooth surface and 90.2 ±7.6 degrees versus 131.5 ±2.1 degrees for the rough surface. In SEM analysis, the C albicans biofilm was found to grow more on the surface of the denture base resin without the TMS coating than on the surfaces of the experimental group. In the adhesion test, the amount of C albicans adhering to the surface of denture base resin with the TMS coating was significantly less than that on the surfaces without TMS coating (P<.05). Conclusions TMS coating significantly reduced the adhesion of C albicans to the denture base resin and may reduce denture stomatitis.

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