Efficacy of a smoking quit line in the military

Baseline design and analysis

Phyllis Richey, Robert Klesges, Gerald Talcott, Margaret DeBon, Catherine Womack, Fridtjof Thomas, Ann Hryshko-Mullen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirty percent of all military personnel smoke cigarettes. Because of the negative health consequences and their impact on physical fitness, overall health, and military readiness, the Department of Defense has identified the reduction of tobacco use as a priority of US military forces. This study aims to evaluate the one-year efficacy of a proactive versus reactive smoking quit line in the US military with adjunctive nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in both groups. This paper reports on the baseline variables of the first 1000 participants randomized, the design, and proposed analysis of the randomized two-arm clinical trial "Efficacy of a Tobacco Quit Line in the Military". Participants are adult smokers who are Armed Forces Active Duty personnel, retirees, Reservist, National Guard and family member healthcare beneficiaries. All participants are randomized to either the Counselor Initiated (proactive) group, receiving 6 counseling sessions in addition to an 8-week supply of NRT, or the Self-Paced (reactive) group, in which they may call the quit line themselves to receive the same counseling sessions, in addition to a 2-week supply of NRT. The primary outcome measure of the study is self-reported smoking abstinence at 1-year follow-up. Results from this study will be the first to provide evidence for the efficacy of an intensive Counselor Initiated quit line with provided NRT in military personnel and could lead to dissemination throughout the US Air Force, the armed forces population as a whole and ultimately to civilian personnel that do not have ready access to preventive health services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)959-968
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

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Nicotine
Smoking
Military Personnel
Counseling
Preventive Health Services
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Fitness
Health
Tobacco Use
Therapeutics
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Tobacco
Air
Clinical Trials
Delivery of Health Care
Population
Counselors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Efficacy of a smoking quit line in the military : Baseline design and analysis. / Richey, Phyllis; Klesges, Robert; Talcott, Gerald; DeBon, Margaret; Womack, Catherine; Thomas, Fridtjof; Hryshko-Mullen, Ann.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.09.2012, p. 959-968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richey, Phyllis ; Klesges, Robert ; Talcott, Gerald ; DeBon, Margaret ; Womack, Catherine ; Thomas, Fridtjof ; Hryshko-Mullen, Ann. / Efficacy of a smoking quit line in the military : Baseline design and analysis. In: Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 959-968.
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