Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer

Robert Klesges, Rebecca Krukowski, James L. Klosky, Wei Liu, Deo Kumar Srivastava, James M. Boyett, Jennifer Q. Lanctot, Melissa M. Hudson, Charla Folsom, Leslie L. Robison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of two evidence-based tobacco quitlines in adult survivors of childhood cancer who regularly smoke cigarettes. Methods: A total of 519 adult survivors of childhood cancer were randomized to either Proactive + 4 weeks of medication (Counselor-initiated intervention, n = 260) or a Reactive + 2 weeks of medication (Participant-initiated intervention, n = 259) condition. Both conditions received telephone counseling to quit smoking as well as nicotine replacement therapy. The primary outcome was biochemically verified (i.e. cotinine) point prevalence smoking cessation at 12 months follow-up. Results: Participants randomized to the Proactive + 4 weeks of medication condition self-reported a higher rate of cessation than those survivors in the Reactive + 2 weeks of medication condition at 8 weeks (33.2% vs. 17.0%, p <.001), but cessation rates were not significantly different at 12 months (23.0% vs. 18.7%, p =.29). However, 80% of participants claiming abstinence failed biochemical verification, indicating marked falsification of self-reported smoking status. Adjusted cessation rates were less than 2% in both intervention conditions. Conclusions: Our results indicate that neither a Proactive + 4 weeks of medication or Reactive + 2 weeks of medication quitline significantly impacted long-term smoking cessation rates. Our results further indicate that self-reports of smoking status are unreliable in survivors of childhood cancer, a population in considerable need of tobacco abstinence. Rates of smoking cessation may be markedly overestimated in studies of childhood cancer survivors that rely on self-reports of tobacco abstinence, and future studies need to include biochemical verification of tobacco status in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)710-718
Number of pages9
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Tobacco
Survivors
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
Neoplasms
Self Report
Cotinine
Nicotine
Telephone
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Population
Counseling
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Klesges, R., Krukowski, R., Klosky, J. L., Liu, W., Srivastava, D. K., Boyett, J. M., ... Robison, L. L. (2015). Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 17(6), 710-718. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntu216

Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer. / Klesges, Robert; Krukowski, Rebecca; Klosky, James L.; Liu, Wei; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Boyett, James M.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Folsom, Charla; Robison, Leslie L.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.01.2015, p. 710-718.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, R, Krukowski, R, Klosky, JL, Liu, W, Srivastava, DK, Boyett, JM, Lanctot, JQ, Hudson, MM, Folsom, C & Robison, LL 2015, 'Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 710-718. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntu216
Klesges, Robert ; Krukowski, Rebecca ; Klosky, James L. ; Liu, Wei ; Srivastava, Deo Kumar ; Boyett, James M. ; Lanctot, Jennifer Q. ; Hudson, Melissa M. ; Folsom, Charla ; Robison, Leslie L. / Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer. In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 710-718.
@article{671bbf94abd244a2a6c3b45dfc265c36,
title = "Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer",
abstract = "Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of two evidence-based tobacco quitlines in adult survivors of childhood cancer who regularly smoke cigarettes. Methods: A total of 519 adult survivors of childhood cancer were randomized to either Proactive + 4 weeks of medication (Counselor-initiated intervention, n = 260) or a Reactive + 2 weeks of medication (Participant-initiated intervention, n = 259) condition. Both conditions received telephone counseling to quit smoking as well as nicotine replacement therapy. The primary outcome was biochemically verified (i.e. cotinine) point prevalence smoking cessation at 12 months follow-up. Results: Participants randomized to the Proactive + 4 weeks of medication condition self-reported a higher rate of cessation than those survivors in the Reactive + 2 weeks of medication condition at 8 weeks (33.2{\%} vs. 17.0{\%}, p <.001), but cessation rates were not significantly different at 12 months (23.0{\%} vs. 18.7{\%}, p =.29). However, 80{\%} of participants claiming abstinence failed biochemical verification, indicating marked falsification of self-reported smoking status. Adjusted cessation rates were less than 2{\%} in both intervention conditions. Conclusions: Our results indicate that neither a Proactive + 4 weeks of medication or Reactive + 2 weeks of medication quitline significantly impacted long-term smoking cessation rates. Our results further indicate that self-reports of smoking status are unreliable in survivors of childhood cancer, a population in considerable need of tobacco abstinence. Rates of smoking cessation may be markedly overestimated in studies of childhood cancer survivors that rely on self-reports of tobacco abstinence, and future studies need to include biochemical verification of tobacco status in this population.",
author = "Robert Klesges and Rebecca Krukowski and Klosky, {James L.} and Wei Liu and Srivastava, {Deo Kumar} and Boyett, {James M.} and Lanctot, {Jennifer Q.} and Hudson, {Melissa M.} and Charla Folsom and Robison, {Leslie L.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ntr/ntu216",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "710--718",
journal = "Nicotine and Tobacco Research",
issn = "1462-2203",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficacy of a tobacco quitline among adult survivors of childhood cancer

AU - Klesges, Robert

AU - Krukowski, Rebecca

AU - Klosky, James L.

AU - Liu, Wei

AU - Srivastava, Deo Kumar

AU - Boyett, James M.

AU - Lanctot, Jennifer Q.

AU - Hudson, Melissa M.

AU - Folsom, Charla

AU - Robison, Leslie L.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of two evidence-based tobacco quitlines in adult survivors of childhood cancer who regularly smoke cigarettes. Methods: A total of 519 adult survivors of childhood cancer were randomized to either Proactive + 4 weeks of medication (Counselor-initiated intervention, n = 260) or a Reactive + 2 weeks of medication (Participant-initiated intervention, n = 259) condition. Both conditions received telephone counseling to quit smoking as well as nicotine replacement therapy. The primary outcome was biochemically verified (i.e. cotinine) point prevalence smoking cessation at 12 months follow-up. Results: Participants randomized to the Proactive + 4 weeks of medication condition self-reported a higher rate of cessation than those survivors in the Reactive + 2 weeks of medication condition at 8 weeks (33.2% vs. 17.0%, p <.001), but cessation rates were not significantly different at 12 months (23.0% vs. 18.7%, p =.29). However, 80% of participants claiming abstinence failed biochemical verification, indicating marked falsification of self-reported smoking status. Adjusted cessation rates were less than 2% in both intervention conditions. Conclusions: Our results indicate that neither a Proactive + 4 weeks of medication or Reactive + 2 weeks of medication quitline significantly impacted long-term smoking cessation rates. Our results further indicate that self-reports of smoking status are unreliable in survivors of childhood cancer, a population in considerable need of tobacco abstinence. Rates of smoking cessation may be markedly overestimated in studies of childhood cancer survivors that rely on self-reports of tobacco abstinence, and future studies need to include biochemical verification of tobacco status in this population.

AB - Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of two evidence-based tobacco quitlines in adult survivors of childhood cancer who regularly smoke cigarettes. Methods: A total of 519 adult survivors of childhood cancer were randomized to either Proactive + 4 weeks of medication (Counselor-initiated intervention, n = 260) or a Reactive + 2 weeks of medication (Participant-initiated intervention, n = 259) condition. Both conditions received telephone counseling to quit smoking as well as nicotine replacement therapy. The primary outcome was biochemically verified (i.e. cotinine) point prevalence smoking cessation at 12 months follow-up. Results: Participants randomized to the Proactive + 4 weeks of medication condition self-reported a higher rate of cessation than those survivors in the Reactive + 2 weeks of medication condition at 8 weeks (33.2% vs. 17.0%, p <.001), but cessation rates were not significantly different at 12 months (23.0% vs. 18.7%, p =.29). However, 80% of participants claiming abstinence failed biochemical verification, indicating marked falsification of self-reported smoking status. Adjusted cessation rates were less than 2% in both intervention conditions. Conclusions: Our results indicate that neither a Proactive + 4 weeks of medication or Reactive + 2 weeks of medication quitline significantly impacted long-term smoking cessation rates. Our results further indicate that self-reports of smoking status are unreliable in survivors of childhood cancer, a population in considerable need of tobacco abstinence. Rates of smoking cessation may be markedly overestimated in studies of childhood cancer survivors that rely on self-reports of tobacco abstinence, and future studies need to include biochemical verification of tobacco status in this population.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942089254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942089254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ntr/ntu216

DO - 10.1093/ntr/ntu216

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 710

EP - 718

JO - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

JF - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

SN - 1462-2203

IS - 6

ER -