eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults

A systematic review with meta-analysis

M. J. Hutchesson, M. E. Rollo, Rebecca Krukowski, L. Ells, J. Harvey, P. J. Morgan, R. Callister, R. Plotnikoff, C. E. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-392
Number of pages17
JournalObesity Reviews
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Telemedicine
Meta-Analysis
Obesity
Weight Loss
Maintenance
Technology
Weight Gain
Webcasts
Mobile Applications
Text Messaging
Handheld Computers
Internet
Software
Randomized Controlled Trials
Databases
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults : A systematic review with meta-analysis. / Hutchesson, M. J.; Rollo, M. E.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Ells, L.; Harvey, J.; Morgan, P. J.; Callister, R.; Plotnikoff, R.; Collins, C. E.

In: Obesity Reviews, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 376-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hutchesson, MJ, Rollo, ME, Krukowski, R, Ells, L, Harvey, J, Morgan, PJ, Callister, R, Plotnikoff, R & Collins, CE 2015, 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 376-392. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12268
Hutchesson, M. J. ; Rollo, M. E. ; Krukowski, Rebecca ; Ells, L. ; Harvey, J. ; Morgan, P. J. ; Callister, R. ; Plotnikoff, R. ; Collins, C. E. / eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults : A systematic review with meta-analysis. In: Obesity Reviews. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 376-392.
@article{e33527b329ab4c8ba0a230f9224a21d8,
title = "eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis",
abstract = "A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76{\%} (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2{\%} (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.",
author = "Hutchesson, {M. J.} and Rollo, {M. E.} and Rebecca Krukowski and L. Ells and J. Harvey and Morgan, {P. J.} and R. Callister and R. Plotnikoff and Collins, {C. E.}",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/obr.12268",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "376--392",
journal = "Obesity Reviews",
issn = "1467-7881",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults

T2 - A systematic review with meta-analysis

AU - Hutchesson, M. J.

AU - Rollo, M. E.

AU - Krukowski, Rebecca

AU - Ells, L.

AU - Harvey, J.

AU - Morgan, P. J.

AU - Callister, R.

AU - Plotnikoff, R.

AU - Collins, C. E.

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

AB - A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Eight databases were searched for studies published in English from 1995 to 17September 2014. Eighty-four studies were included, with 183 intervention arms, of which 76% (n=139) included an eHealth component. Sixty-one studies had the primary aim of weight loss, 10 weight loss maintenance, eight weight gain prevention, and five weight loss and maintenance. eHealth interventions were predominantly delivered using the Internet, but also email, text messages, monitoring devices, mobile applications, computer programs, podcasts and personal digital assistants. Forty percent (n=55) of interventions used more than one type of technology, and 43.2% (n=60) were delivered solely using eHealth technologies. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater weight loss (kg) in eHealth weight loss interventions compared with control (MD -2.70 [-3.33,-2.08], P<0.001) or minimal interventions (MD -1.40 [-1.98,-0.82], P<0.001), and in eHealth weight loss interventions with extra components or technologies (MD 1.46 [0.80, 2.13], P<0.001) compared with standard eHealth programmes. The findings support the use of eHealth interventions as a treatment option for obesity, but there is insufficient evidence for the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for weight loss maintenance or weight gain prevention.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84927963811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84927963811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/obr.12268

DO - 10.1111/obr.12268

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 376

EP - 392

JO - Obesity Reviews

JF - Obesity Reviews

SN - 1467-7881

IS - 5

ER -