Eight-second MRI scan for evaluation of shunted hydrocephalus

Scott D. Wait, Ryan Lingo, Frederick Boop, Stephanie L. Einhaus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Pediatric patients harboring shunts placed early in life are subjected to numerous radiographic studies during development of their central nervous system. Radiation is detrimental to these young patients. MRI avoids the risk of radiation but is thought more difficult due to the increased time a young patient must lie motionless during scan acquisition. Optimal radiographic interrogation would be quick, radiation-free, and allow adequate ventricular evaluation. Methods We queried the electronic medical records system of the senior author (SE) for the terms "hydrocephalus" and "shunt malfunction." All patients currently younger than 18 years were included. In the last 5 years, pediatric patients have been evaluated in an office setting with a limited MRI sequence (T1 sagittal, T2 axial, T1 axial, and DWI) lasting a total of 178 s. In the event of significant motion artifact, the total sequence is abandoned and an 8-s T2 diffusionweighted scan is performed. Results Forty-four patients were included in the study (20 males, average age 10.4 yrs). Eighty-eight rapid acquisition scans were obtained. Adequate ventricular evaluation was performed without sedation in every case. In each instance where there was motion, the 8-s scan provided adequate ventricular evaluation. Conclusion Rapid acquisition MRI scanning avoids the deleterious cumulative effects of radiation in pediatric patients and allows adequate evaluation of the ventricles without the need for sedation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1237-1241
Number of pages5
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Fingerprint

Hydrocephalus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Radiation
Pediatrics
Electronic Health Records
Radiation Effects
Artifacts
Central Nervous System

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Eight-second MRI scan for evaluation of shunted hydrocephalus. / Wait, Scott D.; Lingo, Ryan; Boop, Frederick; Einhaus, Stephanie L.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.08.2012, p. 1237-1241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wait, Scott D. ; Lingo, Ryan ; Boop, Frederick ; Einhaus, Stephanie L. / Eight-second MRI scan for evaluation of shunted hydrocephalus. In: Child's Nervous System. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 8. pp. 1237-1241.
@article{4edd256305a14654bbf54314f0438911,
title = "Eight-second MRI scan for evaluation of shunted hydrocephalus",
abstract = "Introduction Pediatric patients harboring shunts placed early in life are subjected to numerous radiographic studies during development of their central nervous system. Radiation is detrimental to these young patients. MRI avoids the risk of radiation but is thought more difficult due to the increased time a young patient must lie motionless during scan acquisition. Optimal radiographic interrogation would be quick, radiation-free, and allow adequate ventricular evaluation. Methods We queried the electronic medical records system of the senior author (SE) for the terms {"}hydrocephalus{"} and {"}shunt malfunction.{"} All patients currently younger than 18 years were included. In the last 5 years, pediatric patients have been evaluated in an office setting with a limited MRI sequence (T1 sagittal, T2 axial, T1 axial, and DWI) lasting a total of 178 s. In the event of significant motion artifact, the total sequence is abandoned and an 8-s T2 diffusionweighted scan is performed. Results Forty-four patients were included in the study (20 males, average age 10.4 yrs). Eighty-eight rapid acquisition scans were obtained. Adequate ventricular evaluation was performed without sedation in every case. In each instance where there was motion, the 8-s scan provided adequate ventricular evaluation. Conclusion Rapid acquisition MRI scanning avoids the deleterious cumulative effects of radiation in pediatric patients and allows adequate evaluation of the ventricles without the need for sedation.",
author = "Wait, {Scott D.} and Ryan Lingo and Frederick Boop and Einhaus, {Stephanie L.}",
year = "2012",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00381-012-1769-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "1237--1241",
journal = "Child's Nervous System",
issn = "0256-7040",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eight-second MRI scan for evaluation of shunted hydrocephalus

AU - Wait, Scott D.

AU - Lingo, Ryan

AU - Boop, Frederick

AU - Einhaus, Stephanie L.

PY - 2012/8/1

Y1 - 2012/8/1

N2 - Introduction Pediatric patients harboring shunts placed early in life are subjected to numerous radiographic studies during development of their central nervous system. Radiation is detrimental to these young patients. MRI avoids the risk of radiation but is thought more difficult due to the increased time a young patient must lie motionless during scan acquisition. Optimal radiographic interrogation would be quick, radiation-free, and allow adequate ventricular evaluation. Methods We queried the electronic medical records system of the senior author (SE) for the terms "hydrocephalus" and "shunt malfunction." All patients currently younger than 18 years were included. In the last 5 years, pediatric patients have been evaluated in an office setting with a limited MRI sequence (T1 sagittal, T2 axial, T1 axial, and DWI) lasting a total of 178 s. In the event of significant motion artifact, the total sequence is abandoned and an 8-s T2 diffusionweighted scan is performed. Results Forty-four patients were included in the study (20 males, average age 10.4 yrs). Eighty-eight rapid acquisition scans were obtained. Adequate ventricular evaluation was performed without sedation in every case. In each instance where there was motion, the 8-s scan provided adequate ventricular evaluation. Conclusion Rapid acquisition MRI scanning avoids the deleterious cumulative effects of radiation in pediatric patients and allows adequate evaluation of the ventricles without the need for sedation.

AB - Introduction Pediatric patients harboring shunts placed early in life are subjected to numerous radiographic studies during development of their central nervous system. Radiation is detrimental to these young patients. MRI avoids the risk of radiation but is thought more difficult due to the increased time a young patient must lie motionless during scan acquisition. Optimal radiographic interrogation would be quick, radiation-free, and allow adequate ventricular evaluation. Methods We queried the electronic medical records system of the senior author (SE) for the terms "hydrocephalus" and "shunt malfunction." All patients currently younger than 18 years were included. In the last 5 years, pediatric patients have been evaluated in an office setting with a limited MRI sequence (T1 sagittal, T2 axial, T1 axial, and DWI) lasting a total of 178 s. In the event of significant motion artifact, the total sequence is abandoned and an 8-s T2 diffusionweighted scan is performed. Results Forty-four patients were included in the study (20 males, average age 10.4 yrs). Eighty-eight rapid acquisition scans were obtained. Adequate ventricular evaluation was performed without sedation in every case. In each instance where there was motion, the 8-s scan provided adequate ventricular evaluation. Conclusion Rapid acquisition MRI scanning avoids the deleterious cumulative effects of radiation in pediatric patients and allows adequate evaluation of the ventricles without the need for sedation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865957204&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865957204&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00381-012-1769-x

DO - 10.1007/s00381-012-1769-x

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 1237

EP - 1241

JO - Child's Nervous System

JF - Child's Nervous System

SN - 0256-7040

IS - 8

ER -