Electromagnetic Navigation Bronchoscopy for Identifying Lung Nodules for Thoracoscopic Resection

Katy A. Marino, Jennifer L. Sullivan, Benny Weksler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Pulmonary nodules smaller than 1 cm can be difficult to identify during minimally invasive resection, necessitating conversion to thoracotomy. We hypothesized that localizing nodules with electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy and marking them with methylene blue would allow minimally invasive resection and reduce conversion to thoracotomy. Methods We retrospectively identified all patients who underwent electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy followed by minimally invasive resection of a pulmonary nodule from 2011 to 2014. Lung nodules smaller than 10 mm and nodules smaller than 20 mm that were also located more than 10 mm from the pleural surface were localized and marked with methylene blue. Immediately after marking, all patients underwent resection. Results Seventy patients underwent electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy marking followed by minimally invasive resection. The majority of patients (68/70, 97%) had one nodule localized; 2 patients (2/70, 3%) had two nodules localized. The median nodule size was 8 mm (range, 4–17 mm; interquartile range, 5 mm). The median distance from the pleural surface was 6 mm (range, 1–19 mm; interquartile range, 6 mm). There were no conversions to thoracotomy. Nodule marking was successful in 70 of 72 attempts (97.2%); two nodules were identified by palpation. The nodules were most commonly metastases from other sites (31/70, 44.3%). There were no adverse events related to electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy—guided marking or wedge resection, and minimal adverse events after resections that were more extensive. Conclusions Localizing and marking small pulmonary nodules using electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy is safe and effective for nodule identification before minimally invasive resection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-457
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume102
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Electromagnetic Phenomena
Bronchoscopy
Thoracotomy
Lung
Methylene Blue
Palpation
Neoplasm Metastasis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Electromagnetic Navigation Bronchoscopy for Identifying Lung Nodules for Thoracoscopic Resection. / Marino, Katy A.; Sullivan, Jennifer L.; Weksler, Benny.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 102, No. 2, 01.08.2016, p. 454-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background Pulmonary nodules smaller than 1 cm can be difficult to identify during minimally invasive resection, necessitating conversion to thoracotomy. We hypothesized that localizing nodules with electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy and marking them with methylene blue would allow minimally invasive resection and reduce conversion to thoracotomy. Methods We retrospectively identified all patients who underwent electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy followed by minimally invasive resection of a pulmonary nodule from 2011 to 2014. Lung nodules smaller than 10 mm and nodules smaller than 20 mm that were also located more than 10 mm from the pleural surface were localized and marked with methylene blue. Immediately after marking, all patients underwent resection. Results Seventy patients underwent electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy marking followed by minimally invasive resection. The majority of patients (68/70, 97{\%}) had one nodule localized; 2 patients (2/70, 3{\%}) had two nodules localized. The median nodule size was 8 mm (range, 4–17 mm; interquartile range, 5 mm). The median distance from the pleural surface was 6 mm (range, 1–19 mm; interquartile range, 6 mm). There were no conversions to thoracotomy. Nodule marking was successful in 70 of 72 attempts (97.2{\%}); two nodules were identified by palpation. The nodules were most commonly metastases from other sites (31/70, 44.3{\%}). There were no adverse events related to electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy—guided marking or wedge resection, and minimal adverse events after resections that were more extensive. Conclusions Localizing and marking small pulmonary nodules using electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy is safe and effective for nodule identification before minimally invasive resection.",
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