Electronic cigarette use outcome expectancies among college students

Pallav Pokhrel, Melissa A. Little, Pebbles Fagan, Nicholas Muranaka, Thaddeus A. Herzog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: E-cigarette use outcome expectancies and their relationships with demographic and e-cigarette use variables are not well understood. Based on past cigarette as well as e-cigarette use research, we generated self-report items to assess e-cigarette outcome expectancies among college students. The objective was to determine different dimensions of e-cigarette use expectancies and their associations with e-cigarette use and use susceptibility. Methods: Self-report data were collected from 307 multiethnic 4- and 2-year college students [. M age = 23.5 (SD = 5.5); 65% Female 35% current cigarette smokers] in Hawaii. Data analyses were conducted by using factor and regression analyses. Results: Exploratory factor analysis among e-cigarette ever-users indicated 7 factors: 3 positive expectancy factors (social enhancement, affect regulation, positive sensory experience) and 4 negative expectancy factors (negative health consequences, addiction concern, negative appearance, negative sensory experience). Confirmatory factor analysis among e-cigarette never-users indicated that the 7-factor model fitted reasonably well to the data. Being a current cigarette smoker was positively associated with positive expectancies and inversely with negative expectancies. Higher positive expectancies were significantly associated with greater likelihood of past-30-day e-cigarette use. Except addiction concern, higher negative expectancies were significantly associated with lower likelihood of past-30-day e-cigarette use. Among e-cigarette never-users, positive expectancy variables were significantly associated with higher intentions to use e-cigarettes in the future, adjusting for current smoker status and demographic variables. Conclusions: E-cigarette use expectancies determined in this study appear to predict e-cigarette use and use susceptibility among young adults and thus have important implications for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1062-1065
Number of pages4
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Tobacco Products
Students
Statistical Factor Analysis
Electronic Cigarettes
Factor analysis
Self Report
Demography
Young Adult
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pokhrel, P., Little, M. A., Fagan, P., Muranaka, N., & Herzog, T. A. (2014). Electronic cigarette use outcome expectancies among college students. Addictive Behaviors, 39(6), 1062-1065. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.02.014

Electronic cigarette use outcome expectancies among college students. / Pokhrel, Pallav; Little, Melissa A.; Fagan, Pebbles; Muranaka, Nicholas; Herzog, Thaddeus A.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 1062-1065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pokhrel, P, Little, MA, Fagan, P, Muranaka, N & Herzog, TA 2014, 'Electronic cigarette use outcome expectancies among college students', Addictive Behaviors, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 1062-1065. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.02.014
Pokhrel, Pallav ; Little, Melissa A. ; Fagan, Pebbles ; Muranaka, Nicholas ; Herzog, Thaddeus A. / Electronic cigarette use outcome expectancies among college students. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 1062-1065.
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