Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes

The Time Is Ripe for Integration Into Patient Care and Clinical Research

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the emerging team-based approach to delivering cancer care, collecting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provides longitudinal monitoring of treatment adverse effects, disease complications, functional statuses, and psychological states throughout the cancer continuum for all providers to use. Electronic systems offer added capabilities, including easy quantitation of individual symptom items and aggregated scales, standardization, and longitudinal tracking of patient surveys for trend analysis over time. An ideal electronic PRO (ePRO) platform is clinically relevant, validated, and reliable and would offer patient usability. Additionally, it should allow for automated responses to and from patients, have scheduling functionality, and send real-time alerts to site personnel and patients. Clinical interfaces should be easy to read and integrated into the electronic medical record. Multiple ePRO systems, often using electronic tablets, have been created and are beginning to be widely deployed. The Patient Care Monitor is one example of a system that has evolved into a comprehensive patient engagement platform, with a complete review of systems survey and capabilities for mobile health usage. Recent clinical trials have established ePRO systems as an effective method of providing information, which aids improved patient outcomes, including reduced health resource utilization and longer time on therapy. ePROs are also increasingly incorporated into clinical trials, where they can provide more thorough reporting of adverse events than can be captured by alternative methods. Mobile devices have the potential to become the method by which all members of the provider team communicate with patients both at the point-of-care and between clinic visits to optimize care delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e89-e96
JournalAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology educational book. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Meeting
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Patient Care
Research
Patient Identification Systems
Point-of-Care Systems
Clinical Trials
Patient Participation
Telemedicine
Electronic Health Records
Health Resources
Ambulatory Care
Tablets
Neoplasms
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Psychology
Equipment and Supplies
Therapeutics
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{9a233b60e1f74e4097199df999881ef6,
title = "Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes: The Time Is Ripe for Integration Into Patient Care and Clinical Research",
abstract = "In the emerging team-based approach to delivering cancer care, collecting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provides longitudinal monitoring of treatment adverse effects, disease complications, functional statuses, and psychological states throughout the cancer continuum for all providers to use. Electronic systems offer added capabilities, including easy quantitation of individual symptom items and aggregated scales, standardization, and longitudinal tracking of patient surveys for trend analysis over time. An ideal electronic PRO (ePRO) platform is clinically relevant, validated, and reliable and would offer patient usability. Additionally, it should allow for automated responses to and from patients, have scheduling functionality, and send real-time alerts to site personnel and patients. Clinical interfaces should be easy to read and integrated into the electronic medical record. Multiple ePRO systems, often using electronic tablets, have been created and are beginning to be widely deployed. The Patient Care Monitor is one example of a system that has evolved into a comprehensive patient engagement platform, with a complete review of systems survey and capabilities for mobile health usage. Recent clinical trials have established ePRO systems as an effective method of providing information, which aids improved patient outcomes, including reduced health resource utilization and longer time on therapy. ePROs are also increasingly incorporated into clinical trials, where they can provide more thorough reporting of adverse events than can be captured by alternative methods. Mobile devices have the potential to become the method by which all members of the provider team communicate with patients both at the point-of-care and between clinic visits to optimize care delivery.",
author = "Lee Schwartzberg",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.14694/EDBK_158749",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "e89--e96",
journal = "American Society of Clinical Oncology educational book / ASCO. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Meeting",
issn = "1548-8756",
publisher = "American Society of Clinical Oncology",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes

T2 - The Time Is Ripe for Integration Into Patient Care and Clinical Research

AU - Schwartzberg, Lee

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - In the emerging team-based approach to delivering cancer care, collecting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provides longitudinal monitoring of treatment adverse effects, disease complications, functional statuses, and psychological states throughout the cancer continuum for all providers to use. Electronic systems offer added capabilities, including easy quantitation of individual symptom items and aggregated scales, standardization, and longitudinal tracking of patient surveys for trend analysis over time. An ideal electronic PRO (ePRO) platform is clinically relevant, validated, and reliable and would offer patient usability. Additionally, it should allow for automated responses to and from patients, have scheduling functionality, and send real-time alerts to site personnel and patients. Clinical interfaces should be easy to read and integrated into the electronic medical record. Multiple ePRO systems, often using electronic tablets, have been created and are beginning to be widely deployed. The Patient Care Monitor is one example of a system that has evolved into a comprehensive patient engagement platform, with a complete review of systems survey and capabilities for mobile health usage. Recent clinical trials have established ePRO systems as an effective method of providing information, which aids improved patient outcomes, including reduced health resource utilization and longer time on therapy. ePROs are also increasingly incorporated into clinical trials, where they can provide more thorough reporting of adverse events than can be captured by alternative methods. Mobile devices have the potential to become the method by which all members of the provider team communicate with patients both at the point-of-care and between clinic visits to optimize care delivery.

AB - In the emerging team-based approach to delivering cancer care, collecting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) provides longitudinal monitoring of treatment adverse effects, disease complications, functional statuses, and psychological states throughout the cancer continuum for all providers to use. Electronic systems offer added capabilities, including easy quantitation of individual symptom items and aggregated scales, standardization, and longitudinal tracking of patient surveys for trend analysis over time. An ideal electronic PRO (ePRO) platform is clinically relevant, validated, and reliable and would offer patient usability. Additionally, it should allow for automated responses to and from patients, have scheduling functionality, and send real-time alerts to site personnel and patients. Clinical interfaces should be easy to read and integrated into the electronic medical record. Multiple ePRO systems, often using electronic tablets, have been created and are beginning to be widely deployed. The Patient Care Monitor is one example of a system that has evolved into a comprehensive patient engagement platform, with a complete review of systems survey and capabilities for mobile health usage. Recent clinical trials have established ePRO systems as an effective method of providing information, which aids improved patient outcomes, including reduced health resource utilization and longer time on therapy. ePROs are also increasingly incorporated into clinical trials, where they can provide more thorough reporting of adverse events than can be captured by alternative methods. Mobile devices have the potential to become the method by which all members of the provider team communicate with patients both at the point-of-care and between clinic visits to optimize care delivery.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011565698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011565698&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.14694/EDBK_158749

DO - 10.14694/EDBK_158749

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - e89-e96

JO - American Society of Clinical Oncology educational book / ASCO. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Meeting

JF - American Society of Clinical Oncology educational book / ASCO. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Meeting

SN - 1548-8756

ER -