Emerging drugs for the treatment of dry eye disease

Neha Gadaria-Rathod, Kyu In Lee, Penny Asbell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Dry eye disease (DED) is a common, age-related ocular condition that in its mildest forms causes bothersome symptoms of ocular discomfort, fatigue, and visual disturbance that interfere with quality of life and in its more severe forms causes chronic pain and fluctuating vision. Though it is highly prevalent and costs billions of dollars to manage, current treatments have largely been inadequate, making it a frustrating condition, both for physicians and patients alike. Areas covered: This article will cover the recently discovered pathophysiology of DED that has prompted investigators to explore new molecules that target the core mechanisms that drive DED. These include anti-inflammatory/immune-modulatory drugs, secretagogues, lubricant, hormones, and autologous serum. Their potential mechanism of action and data from recent trials on efficacy/safety will be reviewed. Expert opinion: The emerging drugs have a vast range of putative mechanisms of action that may not only provide symptomatic relief but may potentially break the vicious cycle of DED and provide long-lasting cure. Current and future research may change our perspective on DED and redefine its treatment algorithms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-136
Number of pages16
JournalExpert Opinion on Emerging Drugs
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

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Eye Diseases
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Asthenopia
Therapeutics
Lubricants
Expert Testimony
Chronic Pain
Action Potentials
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Quality of Life
Research Personnel
Hormones
Physicians
Safety
Costs and Cost Analysis
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Emerging drugs for the treatment of dry eye disease. / Gadaria-Rathod, Neha; Lee, Kyu In; Asbell, Penny.

In: Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.06.2013, p. 121-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gadaria-Rathod, Neha ; Lee, Kyu In ; Asbell, Penny. / Emerging drugs for the treatment of dry eye disease. In: Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs. 2013 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 121-136.
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