Empathy and gender inequity in engineering disciplines

Eddie L. Jacobs, Amy Curry, Russell J. Deaton, Carmen Astorne-Figari, Douglas Clark Strohmer

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on analysis of published studies, we posit that the current owned identity of many engineering disciplines lacks empathy as a core element and that this may be a barrier to entry for women, especially in disciplines that are perceived as having little concern for the welfare of others. Moreover, as a consequence of this lack of empathy, the actual identity of engineering as embodied in faculty and academic programs may be in conflict with those human-centered values expressed by it's professional organizations. Therefore, to increase enrollment of women in engineering programs, a reformulation of the engineering identity to consciously incorporate empathy may be required. Our overall research efforts will be centered on first characterizing the empathetic aspects of this owned identity within some of the sub-disciplines of engineering, identifying the degree to which a perceived lack of empathy forms a barrier for women pursuing engineering as a field of study, and finally to formulate ways of transforming faculty and student attitudes in ways that will lead to the formation of an engineering identity that is more open to the concerns of women and more consistent with the values defined in the professional codes and creeds. This paper reports on our progress to date and our plans for future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jun 26 2016
Externally publishedYes
Event123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Jun 26 2016Jun 29 2016

Other

Other123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period6/26/166/29/16

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Jacobs, E. L., Curry, A., Deaton, R. J., Astorne-Figari, C., & Strohmer, D. C. (2016). Empathy and gender inequity in engineering disciplines. Paper presented at 123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, New Orleans, United States.

Empathy and gender inequity in engineering disciplines. / Jacobs, Eddie L.; Curry, Amy; Deaton, Russell J.; Astorne-Figari, Carmen; Strohmer, Douglas Clark.

2016. Paper presented at 123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, New Orleans, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Jacobs, EL, Curry, A, Deaton, RJ, Astorne-Figari, C & Strohmer, DC 2016, 'Empathy and gender inequity in engineering disciplines' Paper presented at 123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, New Orleans, United States, 6/26/16 - 6/29/16, .
Jacobs EL, Curry A, Deaton RJ, Astorne-Figari C, Strohmer DC. Empathy and gender inequity in engineering disciplines. 2016. Paper presented at 123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, New Orleans, United States.
Jacobs, Eddie L. ; Curry, Amy ; Deaton, Russell J. ; Astorne-Figari, Carmen ; Strohmer, Douglas Clark. / Empathy and gender inequity in engineering disciplines. Paper presented at 123rd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, New Orleans, United States.
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