Enhanced nicotine metabolism in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers

Simultaneous determination of nicotine and its four metabolites in their plasma using a simple and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique

Ravinder Earla, Anusha Ande, Carole McArthur, Anil Kumar, Santosh Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking is approximately three times more prevalent in HIV-1-positive than HIV-negative individuals in the United States. Nicotine, which is the major constituent of tobacco, is rapidly metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP2A6) to many metabolites. In this study, we developed a simple, fast, and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using a strong cation solid phase extraction, and determined the concentration of nicotine and its four major metabolites (cotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) in the plasma of HIV-1-positive and HIV-negative smokers. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions for nicotine, cotinine, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, nicotine-d4, and cotinine-d3 were selected at mass-to-charge ratios of 163.3/117.1, 177.5/80.3, 193.2/80.1, 149.5/132.3, 163.4/80.3, 167.3/121.4, and 180.3/101.2, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation for nicotine and its metabolites was 0.53 ng/ml, which is relatively more sensitive than those previously reported. The concentration of nicotine was detected 5-fold lower in HIV-1-positive smokers (7.17 ± 3.8 ng/ml) than that observed in HIV-negative smokers (33.29 ± 15.4 ng/ml), whereas the concentration of the metabolite nornicotine was 3-fold higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (6.8 ± 2.9 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (2.3 ± 1.2 ng/ml). Although it was statistically nonsignificant, the concentration of the metabolite cotinine was also higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (85.6 ± 60.5 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (74.9 ± 40.5 ng/ml). In conclusion, a decrease in the concentration of nicotine and an increase in the concentration of its metabolites in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers support the hypothesis that nicotine metabolism is enhanced in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-293
Number of pages12
JournalDrug Metabolism and Disposition
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Nicotine
Liquid Chromatography
nornicotine
HIV-1
HIV
Cotinine
Solid Phase Extraction
Tobacco
Cations
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

@article{7d380076df514f459823ef79e2586c1a,
title = "Enhanced nicotine metabolism in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers: Simultaneous determination of nicotine and its four metabolites in their plasma using a simple and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique",
abstract = "Smoking is approximately three times more prevalent in HIV-1-positive than HIV-negative individuals in the United States. Nicotine, which is the major constituent of tobacco, is rapidly metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP2A6) to many metabolites. In this study, we developed a simple, fast, and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using a strong cation solid phase extraction, and determined the concentration of nicotine and its four major metabolites (cotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) in the plasma of HIV-1-positive and HIV-negative smokers. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions for nicotine, cotinine, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, nicotine-d4, and cotinine-d3 were selected at mass-to-charge ratios of 163.3/117.1, 177.5/80.3, 193.2/80.1, 149.5/132.3, 163.4/80.3, 167.3/121.4, and 180.3/101.2, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation for nicotine and its metabolites was 0.53 ng/ml, which is relatively more sensitive than those previously reported. The concentration of nicotine was detected 5-fold lower in HIV-1-positive smokers (7.17 ± 3.8 ng/ml) than that observed in HIV-negative smokers (33.29 ± 15.4 ng/ml), whereas the concentration of the metabolite nornicotine was 3-fold higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (6.8 ± 2.9 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (2.3 ± 1.2 ng/ml). Although it was statistically nonsignificant, the concentration of the metabolite cotinine was also higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (85.6 ± 60.5 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (74.9 ± 40.5 ng/ml). In conclusion, a decrease in the concentration of nicotine and an increase in the concentration of its metabolites in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers support the hypothesis that nicotine metabolism is enhanced in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers.",
author = "Ravinder Earla and Anusha Ande and Carole McArthur and Anil Kumar and Santosh Kumar",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1124/dmd.113.055186",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "282--293",
journal = "Drug Metabolism and Disposition",
issn = "0090-9556",
publisher = "American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enhanced nicotine metabolism in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers

T2 - Simultaneous determination of nicotine and its four metabolites in their plasma using a simple and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique

AU - Earla, Ravinder

AU - Ande, Anusha

AU - McArthur, Carole

AU - Kumar, Anil

AU - Kumar, Santosh

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Smoking is approximately three times more prevalent in HIV-1-positive than HIV-negative individuals in the United States. Nicotine, which is the major constituent of tobacco, is rapidly metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP2A6) to many metabolites. In this study, we developed a simple, fast, and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using a strong cation solid phase extraction, and determined the concentration of nicotine and its four major metabolites (cotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) in the plasma of HIV-1-positive and HIV-negative smokers. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions for nicotine, cotinine, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, nicotine-d4, and cotinine-d3 were selected at mass-to-charge ratios of 163.3/117.1, 177.5/80.3, 193.2/80.1, 149.5/132.3, 163.4/80.3, 167.3/121.4, and 180.3/101.2, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation for nicotine and its metabolites was 0.53 ng/ml, which is relatively more sensitive than those previously reported. The concentration of nicotine was detected 5-fold lower in HIV-1-positive smokers (7.17 ± 3.8 ng/ml) than that observed in HIV-negative smokers (33.29 ± 15.4 ng/ml), whereas the concentration of the metabolite nornicotine was 3-fold higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (6.8 ± 2.9 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (2.3 ± 1.2 ng/ml). Although it was statistically nonsignificant, the concentration of the metabolite cotinine was also higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (85.6 ± 60.5 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (74.9 ± 40.5 ng/ml). In conclusion, a decrease in the concentration of nicotine and an increase in the concentration of its metabolites in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers support the hypothesis that nicotine metabolism is enhanced in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers.

AB - Smoking is approximately three times more prevalent in HIV-1-positive than HIV-negative individuals in the United States. Nicotine, which is the major constituent of tobacco, is rapidly metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP2A6) to many metabolites. In this study, we developed a simple, fast, and sensitive electrospray ionization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using a strong cation solid phase extraction, and determined the concentration of nicotine and its four major metabolites (cotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) in the plasma of HIV-1-positive and HIV-negative smokers. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions for nicotine, cotinine, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, nicotine-d4, and cotinine-d3 were selected at mass-to-charge ratios of 163.3/117.1, 177.5/80.3, 193.2/80.1, 149.5/132.3, 163.4/80.3, 167.3/121.4, and 180.3/101.2, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation for nicotine and its metabolites was 0.53 ng/ml, which is relatively more sensitive than those previously reported. The concentration of nicotine was detected 5-fold lower in HIV-1-positive smokers (7.17 ± 3.8 ng/ml) than that observed in HIV-negative smokers (33.29 ± 15.4 ng/ml), whereas the concentration of the metabolite nornicotine was 3-fold higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (6.8 ± 2.9 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (2.3 ± 1.2 ng/ml). Although it was statistically nonsignificant, the concentration of the metabolite cotinine was also higher in HIV-1-positive smokers (85.6 ± 60.5 ng/ml) than in HIV-negative smokers (74.9 ± 40.5 ng/ml). In conclusion, a decrease in the concentration of nicotine and an increase in the concentration of its metabolites in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers support the hypothesis that nicotine metabolism is enhanced in HIV-1-positive smokers compared with HIV-negative smokers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906093942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906093942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1124/dmd.113.055186

DO - 10.1124/dmd.113.055186

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 282

EP - 293

JO - Drug Metabolism and Disposition

JF - Drug Metabolism and Disposition

SN - 0090-9556

IS - 2

ER -