Enhanced prevalence of ankyloglossia with maternal cocaine use

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A series of 500 term neonates was examined in a well-baby nursery, 68 of whom tested positive for maternal cocaine use. From logistic multiple regression equations, weight and crown-heel length were significantly smaller in the maternal cocaine-use subset of this case-control study. Partial ankyloglossia, with a prevalence of 4.4 percent in the overall series, was significantly more common in males than in females (6.0% versus 2.3%), while race (black or white) had no influence on trait frequency. Controlling for race and sex, ankyloglossia was 3.5 times more likely to occur in the drug- use series, perhaps as a function of diminished mitotic rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-76
Number of pages5
JournalCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 1992

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Cocaine
Mothers
Heel
Nurseries
Crowns
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Newborn Infant
Weights and Measures
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Ankyloglossia
hydroquinone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Enhanced prevalence of ankyloglossia with maternal cocaine use. / Harris, Edward; Friend, G. W.; Tolley, Elizabeth.

In: Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, Vol. 29, No. 1, 07.08.1992, p. 72-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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