Enhanced skeletal muscle and liver protein synthesis with structured lipid in enterally fed burned rats

Stephen J. DeMichele, Michael Karlstad, Vigen K. Babayan, Nawfal Istfan, George L. Blackburn, Bruce R. Bistrian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We assessed the effects of total enteral nutrition with long-chain triacylglycerides (LCT), medium-chain triacylglycerides (MCT), or two structured lipids, modified dairy fat (MDF) and modified MCT (Captex 810B, Capital City Products, Columbus, OH), on protein and energy metabolism in hypermetabolic burned rats (25% to 30% body surface area). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 ± 10 g) were continuously gastrostomy-fed isovolemic diets that provided 50 kcal/d, 2 g amino acids/d and 40% nonprotein calories as lipid for three days. Changes in body weight, nitrogen balance, serum albumin, indirect calorimetry, whole body leucine kinetics, and rectus muscle and liver protein kinetics were determined. Whole body leucine kinetics and tissue fractional protein synthetic rates (FSR, percent per day) were estimated using a four-hour constant intravenous infusion of l-[1-14C]leucine on day 3. The group of rats enterally fed MDF lost less body weight than the other groups (P ≤ .05). MDF and Captex 810B produced a positive and significantly greater (P ≤ .05) daily and cumulative nitrogen balance than either LCT or MCT. Oxygen consumption (P ≤ .05) and total energy expenditure (P ≤ .05) were elevated approximately 22% with MDF as compared with LCT or MCT. Rectus muscle FSR and absolute rate of protein synthesis were increased 19% with MDF (P ≤ .05) as compared with LCT or MCT. Liver FSR and absolute rate of protein synthesis were increased (P ≤ .01) 70% and 84%, respectively, with MDF when compared with either LCT, MCT, or Captex 810B. MDF, Captex 810B, and MCT maintained higher serum albumin levels than LCT (P ≤ .01). These results indicate that the use of structured lipids in postburn enteral nutrition attenuates the net protein catabolic effects of burn trauma by improving nitrogen utilization, at least in part, as a result of higher protein synthetic rates in skeletal muscle and liver.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-795
Number of pages9
JournalMetabolism
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Muscle Proteins
Skeletal Muscle
Fats
Lipids
Liver
Leucine
Proteins
Nitrogen
Enteral Nutrition
Serum Albumin
Energy Metabolism
Indirect Calorimetry
Body Weight Changes
Gastrostomy
Body Surface Area
Intravenous Infusions
Oxygen Consumption
Sprague Dawley Rats
Body Weight
Diet

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Enhanced skeletal muscle and liver protein synthesis with structured lipid in enterally fed burned rats. / DeMichele, Stephen J.; Karlstad, Michael; Babayan, Vigen K.; Istfan, Nawfal; Blackburn, George L.; Bistrian, Bruce R.

In: Metabolism, Vol. 37, No. 8, 01.01.1988, p. 787-795.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DeMichele, Stephen J. ; Karlstad, Michael ; Babayan, Vigen K. ; Istfan, Nawfal ; Blackburn, George L. ; Bistrian, Bruce R. / Enhanced skeletal muscle and liver protein synthesis with structured lipid in enterally fed burned rats. In: Metabolism. 1988 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 787-795.
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