Enhancing patient-physician communication

A community and culturally based approach

Michelle Martin, Wendy Keys, Sharina D. Person, Yongin Kim, Rowell S. Ashford, Connie Kohler, Patricia Norton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. African American women are more likely to be diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer. Methods. A total of 15 residents participated in a program to increase their self-efficacy in communication skills relevant to understanding and responding to African American cultural issues associated with mammography screening. Results. Physicians reported increasing confidence in their ability to elicit barriers to mammography; assess cultural beliefs and norms; assess perceived health benefits and emotional adjustment; engage in emotional talk; motivate; and negotiate and build partnerships with patients. Conclusions. A brief program can increase physician communication skills to meet the needs of a diverse population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-154
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Fingerprint

Mammography
African Americans
Communication
Physicians
Aptitude
Insurance Benefits
Self Efficacy
Breast Neoplasms
Population
Emotional Adjustment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Enhancing patient-physician communication : A community and culturally based approach. / Martin, Michelle; Keys, Wendy; Person, Sharina D.; Kim, Yongin; Ashford, Rowell S.; Kohler, Connie; Norton, Patricia.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.09.2005, p. 150-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Michelle ; Keys, Wendy ; Person, Sharina D. ; Kim, Yongin ; Ashford, Rowell S. ; Kohler, Connie ; Norton, Patricia. / Enhancing patient-physician communication : A community and culturally based approach. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 150-154.
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