Enteral fish oil for treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in six infants with short-bowel syndrome

Emma M. Tillman, Catherine Herrington, Dennis Black, Emily B. Hak, Linda F. Lazar, Michael Christensen, Eunice Huang, Richard Helms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective. To evaluate the use of enteral fish oil for the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). Design. Retrospective case series. Setting. Pediatric academic hospital and outpatient clinic. Patients. Six parenteral nutrition-dependent infants with short-bowel syndrome and PNALD. Measurements and Main Results. The six infants received supplementation with enteral fish oil, and treatment was evaluated over a 12-week period. The PNALD, as reflected by elevated total bilirubin levels, completely reversed in four of the six infants within a mean ± SD of 5 ± 2.6 weeks (range 2-8 wks) after initiation of the enteral fish oil supplementation. In addition, improvement in enteral feedings occurred after starting enteral fish oil therapy. Conclusion. Enteral fish oil may be an effective adjunctive treatment option for infants with PNALD, particularly for those infants with PNALD who are tolerating some amount of enteral nutrition as the result of an adequate amount of small bowel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-509
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

Fingerprint

Short Bowel Syndrome
Fish Oils
Parenteral Nutrition
Small Intestine
Liver Diseases
Enteral Nutrition
Therapeutics
Hospital Outpatient Clinics
Pediatric Hospitals
Bilirubin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

@article{2b5d758e207648f495af19c4fde88ada,
title = "Enteral fish oil for treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in six infants with short-bowel syndrome",
abstract = "Study Objective. To evaluate the use of enteral fish oil for the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). Design. Retrospective case series. Setting. Pediatric academic hospital and outpatient clinic. Patients. Six parenteral nutrition-dependent infants with short-bowel syndrome and PNALD. Measurements and Main Results. The six infants received supplementation with enteral fish oil, and treatment was evaluated over a 12-week period. The PNALD, as reflected by elevated total bilirubin levels, completely reversed in four of the six infants within a mean ± SD of 5 ± 2.6 weeks (range 2-8 wks) after initiation of the enteral fish oil supplementation. In addition, improvement in enteral feedings occurred after starting enteral fish oil therapy. Conclusion. Enteral fish oil may be an effective adjunctive treatment option for infants with PNALD, particularly for those infants with PNALD who are tolerating some amount of enteral nutrition as the result of an adequate amount of small bowel.",
author = "Tillman, {Emma M.} and Catherine Herrington and Dennis Black and Hak, {Emily B.} and Lazar, {Linda F.} and Michael Christensen and Eunice Huang and Richard Helms",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1592/phco.31.5.503",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "503--509",
journal = "Pharmacotherapy",
issn = "0277-0008",
publisher = "Pharmacotherapy Publications Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enteral fish oil for treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in six infants with short-bowel syndrome

AU - Tillman, Emma M.

AU - Herrington, Catherine

AU - Black, Dennis

AU - Hak, Emily B.

AU - Lazar, Linda F.

AU - Christensen, Michael

AU - Huang, Eunice

AU - Helms, Richard

PY - 2011/5/1

Y1 - 2011/5/1

N2 - Study Objective. To evaluate the use of enteral fish oil for the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). Design. Retrospective case series. Setting. Pediatric academic hospital and outpatient clinic. Patients. Six parenteral nutrition-dependent infants with short-bowel syndrome and PNALD. Measurements and Main Results. The six infants received supplementation with enteral fish oil, and treatment was evaluated over a 12-week period. The PNALD, as reflected by elevated total bilirubin levels, completely reversed in four of the six infants within a mean ± SD of 5 ± 2.6 weeks (range 2-8 wks) after initiation of the enteral fish oil supplementation. In addition, improvement in enteral feedings occurred after starting enteral fish oil therapy. Conclusion. Enteral fish oil may be an effective adjunctive treatment option for infants with PNALD, particularly for those infants with PNALD who are tolerating some amount of enteral nutrition as the result of an adequate amount of small bowel.

AB - Study Objective. To evaluate the use of enteral fish oil for the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). Design. Retrospective case series. Setting. Pediatric academic hospital and outpatient clinic. Patients. Six parenteral nutrition-dependent infants with short-bowel syndrome and PNALD. Measurements and Main Results. The six infants received supplementation with enteral fish oil, and treatment was evaluated over a 12-week period. The PNALD, as reflected by elevated total bilirubin levels, completely reversed in four of the six infants within a mean ± SD of 5 ± 2.6 weeks (range 2-8 wks) after initiation of the enteral fish oil supplementation. In addition, improvement in enteral feedings occurred after starting enteral fish oil therapy. Conclusion. Enteral fish oil may be an effective adjunctive treatment option for infants with PNALD, particularly for those infants with PNALD who are tolerating some amount of enteral nutrition as the result of an adequate amount of small bowel.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955585776&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955585776&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1592/phco.31.5.503

DO - 10.1592/phco.31.5.503

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 503

EP - 509

JO - Pharmacotherapy

JF - Pharmacotherapy

SN - 0277-0008

IS - 5

ER -