Enteral nutrition with structured lipid: Effect on protein metabolism in thermal injury

S. J. DeMichele, Michael Karlstad, B. R. Bistrian, N. Istfan, V. K. Babayan, G. L. Blackburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of total enteral nutrition with structured and conventional lipids on protein and energy metabolism was assessed in gastrostomy-fed burned rats (30% body surface area) by measuring nitrogen balance, serum albumin, energy expenditure, and rectus muscle and liver fractional synthetic rates of protein (FSRs). Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 ± 10 g received isovolemic diets that provided 50 kcal/d, 2 g/d amino acids, and 40% nonprotein calories as lipid for 3 d. The lipid source was either long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), structured lipid (SL), or a physical mix (PM) of the oils used in SL. Burned rats enterally fed either SL (p < 0.01) or PM (p < 0.05) yielded significantly higher daily and cumulative nitrogen balances and rectus muscle and liver FSRs than those fed either LCTs or MCTs. Rats fed SL or MCTs maintained higher serum albumin concentrations than rats fed either PM or LCTs. This study shows that the enteral administration of a mixed fuel system containing SL or its PM improves protein anabolism and attenuates net protein catabolism after thermal injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1295-1302
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume50
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1989

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heat injury
structured lipids
enteral feeding
Enteral Nutrition
protein metabolism
long chain triacylglycerols
Hot Temperature
medium chain triacylglycerols
Lipids
Triglycerides
rats
Wounds and Injuries
serum albumin
nitrogen balance
Proteins
lipids
muscles
liver
Serum Albumin
Energy Metabolism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

DeMichele, S. J., Karlstad, M., Bistrian, B. R., Istfan, N., Babayan, V. K., & Blackburn, G. L. (1989). Enteral nutrition with structured lipid: Effect on protein metabolism in thermal injury. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 50(6), 1295-1302.

Enteral nutrition with structured lipid : Effect on protein metabolism in thermal injury. / DeMichele, S. J.; Karlstad, Michael; Bistrian, B. R.; Istfan, N.; Babayan, V. K.; Blackburn, G. L.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 50, No. 6, 01.12.1989, p. 1295-1302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DeMichele, SJ, Karlstad, M, Bistrian, BR, Istfan, N, Babayan, VK & Blackburn, GL 1989, 'Enteral nutrition with structured lipid: Effect on protein metabolism in thermal injury', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 1295-1302.
DeMichele SJ, Karlstad M, Bistrian BR, Istfan N, Babayan VK, Blackburn GL. Enteral nutrition with structured lipid: Effect on protein metabolism in thermal injury. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1989 Dec 1;50(6):1295-1302.
DeMichele, S. J. ; Karlstad, Michael ; Bistrian, B. R. ; Istfan, N. ; Babayan, V. K. ; Blackburn, G. L. / Enteral nutrition with structured lipid : Effect on protein metabolism in thermal injury. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1989 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 1295-1302.
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