Entrainment and masking of circadian drinking rhythms in primates

Influence of light intensity

H. Elliott Albers, Ralph Lydic, Martin C. Moore-Ede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The entrained drinking rhythms of squirrel monkeys were studied during exposure to 24 hr illumination cycles of three different intensities (60:0; 66:6; 76:16 lux). Increasing the intensity of ambient illumination significantly delayed the offset of drinking but had no effect on either the onset or the total amount of daily drinking behavior. Comparison of drinking behavior under an alternating schedule of LD 66:6 lux and constant light of 6 lux indicated that the twice daily light transitions consistently altered the temporal distribution of drinking behavior. The daily timing of squirrel monkey drinking behavior thus, depends not only on the mechanisms of circadian entrainment to the LD cycle, but also on the ability of the LD cycle to directly influence, or "mask" behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-211
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

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Drinking Behavior
Circadian Rhythm
Primates
Drinking
Light
Saimiri
Lighting
Aptitude
Masks
Appointments and Schedules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Entrainment and masking of circadian drinking rhythms in primates : Influence of light intensity. / Elliott Albers, H.; Lydic, Ralph; Moore-Ede, Martin C.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.01.1982, p. 205-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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