Eosinophils

Nemeses of Pulmonary Pathogens?

Kim S. LeMessurier, Amali Samarasinghe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Eosinophils are short-lived granulocytes that contain a variety of proteins and lipids traditionally associated with host defense against parasites. The primary goal of this review is to examine more recent evidence that challenged this rather outdated role of eosinophils in the context of pulmonary infections with helminths, viruses, and bacteria. Recent Findings: While eosinophil mechanisms that counter parasites, viruses, and bacteria are similar, the kinetics and impact may differ by pathogen type. Major antiparasitic responses include direct killing and immunoregulation, as well as some mechanisms by which parasite survival/growth is supported. Antiviral defenses may be as unembellished as granule protein-induced direct killing or more urbane as serving as a conduit for better adaptive immune responses to the invading virus. Although sacrificial, eosinophil DNA emitted in response to bacteria helps trap bacteria to limit dissemination. Herein, we discuss the current research redefining eosinophils as multifunctional cells that are active participants in host defense against lung pathogens. Summary: Eosinophils recognize and differentially respond to invading pathogens, allowing them to deploy innate defense mechanisms to contain and clear the infection, or modulate the immune response. Modern technology and animal models have unraveled hitherto unknown capabilities of this surreptitious cell that indubitably has more functions awaiting discovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number36
JournalCurrent Allergy and Asthma Reports
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Eosinophils
Lung
Bacteria
Parasites
Viruses
Antiparasitic Agents
Helminths
Adaptive Immunity
Infection
Granulocytes
Antiviral Agents
Proteins
Animal Models
Technology
Lipids
DNA
Growth
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Eosinophils : Nemeses of Pulmonary Pathogens? / LeMessurier, Kim S.; Samarasinghe, Amali.

In: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, Vol. 19, No. 8, 36, 01.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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